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Asian Tsunamis


Timmy
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people seen the news today/yesterday on the earthquake/tidal waves in indian ocean?

difficult to imagine the scale of the disater over such a wide area from south east asia to east afica. 26,000 (and rising) death toll, british holiday makers killed, 1 million sri lankans (out of a population of 20 million) left effected, tourist industry left in ruins.

brings into context the problems we face with our climate!

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Very Frightening indeed. unsure.gif

Just goes to prove that even with all the technology in the world, nature can bite you in the ass.

I saw a documentary on tv once about one of the canary islands having a volcanic fault line running through it. If a major eruption or earthquake struck along this fragile line, it could send half of the island into the sea, thus causing a HUGE tidal wave to travel across the Atlantic towards the americas (north & south) & carribean. Experts predict the wave could be as much as 400ft high. The wave would behave like a 'ripple' in a pond & go in all directions, part of which would crash into Southern Ireland, South West England & up through the Irish sea. Just think of how many cities & towns are on the Atlantic coastline! They predict millions of deaths if it happens.

The Indian ocean tsunami was caused by an earthquake which made part of the seabed rise by 45ft.

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look at the number of countries effected, Sri lanka, Indonesia, Thailand, India, Somalia, Kenya, Burma, The Maldives

there can't have been such a wide spread diaster like this from years and years (100's years probably)

been to some of the Thai islands effected (Phuket, Phi Phi) difficult to think that there not much left standing now

at least the holiday makers can leave, but it's the locals who are really effected. And a place like Thailand wich many of it's islands are dependent on tourist it could mean ecomomic and social ruin

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horrifying - there by the grace of god.

However if the canary islands ever blow, its quite likely that half a mountain will fall in the seas, creating a wave that would destroy the US' eastern seaboard, along with southern spain and Portugal's coastline and probably wipe out the carriabian.

Oh and Yellowstones due to explde, which would take out most of North America and cause a nuclear winter.

All joy

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Sad news for all that live there.

I have some friends that are thinking of making a donation, but are unsure if the right folks will get the help they need and not have it fund some sort of "freedom fighter" group in Sri Lanka. sad.gif

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The death toll is now 68,000 but I suspect it will rise a lot more.

The deaths of Western Tourists in Thailand seems to be being reported in proportion to the calamity which has affected so many other people which is a more responsible approach by the media than would normally be the case.

However, it seems likely now that there will be at least 2,000 casualties from the Scandanavian countries and that there are hundreds of Germans, Czechs and Americans missing. It seems astonishing that so few British citizens have been lost.

Many of the islands off the coast of Sumatra and some of the towns on Sumatra are only now being reached. I fear the numbers of casualties will rise dramatically.

Similarly some of India's Nicobar and Andeman islands are still being contacted.

I suspect that the military junta in Burma are playing down the reality of what has happened there.

The loss of the train in Sri Lanka makes that the world's worst rail disaster- more than double the number of casualties of the previous worst rail disaster when a typhoon blew a train off a bridge in India in 1981.

I am so pleased that Jan Egelund of the UN did use the word "stingy" in responding to the financial efforts by the west. Even now, after more than doubling the aid offered, the USA is still only offering the same amount as Australia- a country with less than 10% of the USA's population.

There are reports coming out that the Thai authorities were aware of the tsunami risk before it hit but the local officials did not want to worry the tourists. Certainly it seems astonishing that there are few reports of alarms being raised when the sea retreated from the beaches and there were still several minutes available to evacuate.

Putting the strength of the earthquake into context. The average vertical land displacement along the fault is 10 meters along a 1,000km line with local displacements of up to 30 meters. The Earth wobbled slightly on its axis such was the force and it is expected that satelites will show the islands off the coast of Sumatra have moved closer to the mainland and that the sea level will have permanently changed on the coast of Sumatra- several harbours are now dry.

With all that force, it is not surprising the shock waves in the water travelled so far.

I wonder how many people who have reproductions of the famous Japanese wood cut "The Great Wave" realise that it is a representation of the tsunami that killed 26,000 in Japan at the end of the last century? Some of the pictures of the tsunami as it hit Phuket are so redolent of that wood cut.

One last point, whilst there is huge regret that there was no tsunami monitoring in the Indian Ocean (unlike in the Pacific), does anyone know if there is tsunami monitoring in the Atlantic? After all the last Atlantic tsunami was only 80 years (on the Grand Banks of Canada- the previous Indian Ocean tsunami was 160 years ago) and there are under water fault lines round Iceland where the water is shallow enough to trigger a tsunami plus the better known risks which exist in the Canaries.

Edited by philipl
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However, it seems likely now that there will be at least 2,000 casualties from the Scandanavian countries and that there are hundreds of Germans, Czechs and Americans missing. It seems astonishing that so few British citizens have been lost.

According to the news Thai officals claim that over 50 brits have died. But I don't think this has been validated by the UK goverment.

Don't forget in Thailand there are many small islands which are popular with western backpackers but are of the beaten track.

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I have just seen the aerial photographs of some of the towns on the Western side of Sumatra.

They are totally devastated with virtually no sign of life.

Aceh Province had a population of over 1 million, nearly all living on the coasts.

The figure of 80,000 dead in Aceh maybe an underestimate.

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Football matches on several recent dates have had a minute's silence for Ken Bigley, Emlyn Hughes, and Brian Clough.

This week we are seeing one of the world's worst natural tragedies in living memory unfolding.

Bolton v Rovers took place as if nowt had happened.

Can't help thinking it would be different if the loss of life had happened in the good ol' USA.

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There was a minutes silence at Anfield although I think there was some more direct link to the tragedy . Any silence at football grounds is pointless though ; they're already overused and serve no useful purpose in situations like this were there is no direct link with the club or sport .

I note that the British Gov't have very generously upped their aid donation from £1m to £15m to help the innocent victims of the quake. I wonder how this sum compares to that which has been used to fund the killing of the equally innocent victims in Iraq . Prepare to see Blair , Straw and co at their most unctuous any time now....

Let's hope also that the Indian Gov't and people chose to include the lower castes and the so called "untouchables" when it comes to distributing the aid when it arrives . It would be unfortunate if they followed the example set after the earthquake in that region a few years ago when virtually no aid reached those who suffered the most .

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Having lived in Sri Lanka for 6 years I have no idea if any old schoolmates or others I know/knew have been affected. There's just no way to find out really, and it is probably just an indication of what so many thousands of people must be experiencing at the moment. My parents were due to go there in easter, but it's not looking possible anymore, instead we are contemplating going there to give support in the rebuilding and aid process. To those who are wondering what channels to donate through, you can't go wrong with the likes of the World Food Programme, Red Cross or any of the well known humanitarian organisations. I really fear we have only just seen the beginning of the devastation yet.

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A family friend is part Sri Lankan (sp?). According to them, money is the best thing to send at the moment, because there is no specific thing they need, they just need everything. I've personally sent £50, which buys a fair amount of bottled water (seems daft, flooded and no drinkable water). My aunt, however, has been to a charity shop, and they were soing soemthing originally a a novelty xmas gift, where you can buy thing for the less fortunate, so she has bought 10 chickens to be sent.

Crying shame to see so many so devastaed, and on a aesthtic POV, such a loat of stunning scenery destroyed.

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I am so pleased that Jan Egelund of the UN did use the word "stingy" in responding to the financial efforts by the west. Even now, after more than doubling the aid offered, the USA is still only offering the same amount as Australia- a country with less than 10% of the USA's population.

So, Philip, you going to put your money where your mouth is and go down there and help out? Or will it take you too long to get off of your soapbox?

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My aunt, however, has been to a charity shop, and they were soing soemthing originally a a novelty xmas gift, where you can buy thing for the less fortunate, so she has bought 10 chickens to be sent.

Ironically the chances are that those chickens were produced in SE Asia.

Isn't there some strong suspicion that the San Andreas fault could cause something similar in California? I'm sure that I saw something on the tele a while back about that.

As for PhilipL's 'monitoring' suggestion, monitorings fine and with a little luck a few lives would be saved (if the roads could cope with the traffic that is) but buildings, railways and other man-made structures would still be totally trashed so wouldn't it be much better for people to be encouraged to move to higher ground?

Edited by thenodrog
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Football matches on several recent dates have had a minute's silence for Ken Bigley, Emlyn Hughes, and Brian Clough.

This week we are seeing one of the world's worst natural tragedies in living memory unfolding.

Bolton v Rovers took place as if nowt had happened.

Can't help thinking it would be different if the loss of life had happened in the good ol' USA.

I noticed that the england players were wearing black arm bands during the current cricket test.

I agree that the 1 minute silence is over used these days and is becoming devalued. fair enough to pay respect to a late player/manager (but only at the club concerned e.g notts forest/derby for clough), or a major diaster such as the current one, or 9/11.

saying that has there been a 1 minute silence for the 100,000's who have died in irag since the us invasion?

coming back to the topic in question, I think people should stick their hands in their pockets for the victims of probably the biggest natural tragedy in my life time. I gave £50 yesterday

the only problem is will people in 6 months, a year, 2 years still remember, or will compassion fatigue set in?

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I am so pleased that Jan Egelund of the UN did use the word "stingy" in responding to the financial efforts by the west. Even now, after more than doubling the aid offered, the USA is still only offering the same amount as Australia- a country with less than 10% of the USA's population.

So, Philip, you going to put your money where your mouth is and go down there and help out? Or will it take you too long to get off of your soapbox?

The amount the Bush administration first offered was less than the equivalent of 10 minutes interest on the US national debt.

Yes, I'd call that stingy.

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It's all rather hard to take in.

Quite apart from witnessing the grief of those who have lost loved ones; it's brought home to me that we are mere tenants on Earth, and the planet could decide to evict us anytime it wants! With his ability to build the atomic bomb, lay waste to vast areas of land with chemical agents and generally find new and whizzier ways to kill members of his species, amnkind tends to have quite a high opinion of himself.

But as Michael Fish said; the death of the Planet is the Ultimate weapon of mass destruction.

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