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As RTH says all it will need will be some TLC and a bit of expenditure to make it a fine bike. If it was hand built 30 years ago and hasn't been ridden much it will be better than many quite expensive new bikes on the market. Unless you know what you're doing I'd suggest taking it to a good bike shop and asking them to tell you both what you need to do (like the tyres) and what would be nice to do and then make a judgement. If you've not ridden for a bit I'd get it roadworthy and take it out for a few short rides to see how you like it. Then I'll see you on a ride to Glastonbury in 2013!

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Just inherited this bike below, which is in need of renovation. IT is a Dawes hand built in Preston about 30 years ago I beleive. Is it any good?!

It will probably be a very nice ride if restored by someone who knows what to do.

Retro is very cool at present but you won't retire on the proceeds. These things tend to be a labour of love.

Personally I'm more into carbon than Reynolds tubing which is probably how the frame was built.

Dawes have always been in Birmingham. The frame will be from there with other components added in the "hand built" in Preston or wherever.

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Thanks people. I just want to get it going, I reckon WD40 and/or a lot of 3 in 1 oil should sort the chain and cogs out, then I can buy a couple of tubes and tyres which I think I should be able to do. Just need to get someone to set to gears and brakes up. Need to keep the cost down, how much is a set of tubes and tyres likely to cost anyone?

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If the gears are the same age as the bike they won't be indexed and therefore won't need setting up in the modern sense of the term. A bit of cleaning and lube should be enough. The chain looks like it's stretched so you may want to replace that (shouldn't be too expensive) or remove a link or two. A couple of tyres and tubes could be anything from £20 to £90 all-in depending on make and quality.

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Thanks people. I just want to get it going, I reckon WD40 and/or a lot of 3 in 1 oil should sort the chain and cogs out,?

Aaaaaarghhhhh no, no, no

Don't use WD40 on a bike chain. Get some citrus based degreaser or chuck it in a paraffin bath. Then thoroughly clean with warm soapy water (car shampoo is ok, not washing up liquid) and rinse thoroughly with clean cold water.

3 : 1 is ok if you must but you'll get a better result with a wax or cycling specific oil.

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Aaaaaarghhhhh no, no, no

Don't use WD40 on a bike chain. Get some citrus based degreaser or chuck it in a paraffin bath. Then thoroughly clean with warm soapy water (car shampoo is ok, not washing up liquid) and rinse thoroughly with clean cold water.

Paul,

What's the problem with WD40 on a bike chain? I quite regularly clean mine with white spirit, via a paint brush, and then give it a squirt with WD 40. I did have some expensive chain lubricant in the past that didn't seem to make any difference from WD40

Cheers

Colin

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Right-Had a good go at the chain-this is the first job I reckon, get the motion dept operating. But the chain is so rusted that after a lot of effort it won't even go around the cogs and through the derailleur thing. I think I need a new chain. How do you get it off, are they all the same and how do you put a new one on?

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Colin WD40 is basically two parts petrol and one part very thin oil. It also contains PTFE/Teflon. The WD stands for "water displacement." When using WD40, which is excellent for certain jobs, the petrol cleans of dirt and grime and the rather thin oil provides the very minimum amount of lube. Then the WD bit kicks in as it leaves a film of silicon on the surface of whatever you have sprayed which as it is designed to repel water will also repel other lubricants or grease you may chose to use on the chain. The other issues is the penetrating qualities of WD40 mean it can strip grease or oil from internal bits you can't see and can only easily lubricate/grease by stripping down.

There is a load of tosh talked about chain maintenance, I'm guilty of falling in to it! Best bet is simply to lean the chain with some sort of degreaser and then wipe with an oily rag or just drip a small drop on to each link and then wipe away the excess. I use a wax in summer as it tends not to attract dust and a heavier oil in winter which helps to protect against water and salt. I'm probably just being over fussy.

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Right-Had a good go at the chain-this is the first job I reckon, get the motion dept operating. But the chain is so rusted that after a lot of effort it won't even go around the cogs and through the derailleur thing. I think I need a new chain. How do you get it off, are they all the same and how do you put a new one on?

Oz, the chain is also 30 years old? I don't know what the method was then but modern chains work like this Bicycle Tutor

I'm using a laptop rather than a phone tonight so can see the picture better. The bike doesn't look to have had much use, should clean up nicely and make a very nice machine.

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I'm having a few problems with my rear tyre, had 3 punctures this year. Is that normal?

I would say not but it depends on what and where you ride. I ride a road bike mainly on rural roads with my tyres inflated to 8 bar (about 115 psi) and pretty much anything I might go over is going to bounce off a tyre inflated to that pressure.

If you are riding in an urban area (more cr@p on road) and using a bike with wide tyres punctures are more likely. Suggestions to avoid punctures would be:

Use the best quality tyres you can afford.

Buy a track pump with pressure gauge and keep tyres correctly inflated. I check tyre pressure before every ride. Soft tyres puncture more easily.

Ride at least three feet from the curb (should be doing that anyway) as the curb area is where all the rubbish collects

Edited by Paul
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Properly inflated tyres help .Its easy not to bother if its been stood a while and they do down at bit over time..As well the above yYou should check if you have removed to nail thorn or whatever thats caused other punctures locating it by camparinmg the puncture position in your inner tube to the tyre..or simply run your thjumb though the inside i of your tyre feeling for anything sharp .,maybe check the rubber band which shields your inner from the spokesis doing its job with none sticking through it....

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I would say not but it depends on what and where you ride. I ride a road bike mainly on rural roads with my tyres inflated to 8 bar (about 115 psi) and pretty much anything I might go over is going to bounce off a tyre inflated to that pressure.

If you are riding in an urban area (more cr@p on road) and using a bike with wide tyres punctures are more likely. Suggestions to avoid punctures would be:

Use the best quality tyres you can afford.

Buy a track pump with pressure gauge and keep tyres correctly inflated. I check tyre pressure before every ride. Soft tyres puncture more easily.

Ride at least three feet from the curb (should be doing that anyway) as the curb area is where all the rubbish collects

Thinking it may be the urban area's. I might invest in a strong rear tyre.

Bloody frustrating and knocks my confidence. Not done over 40k once this year.

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Broke my bike out of the shed yesterday. First time in nearly 4 years its seen the light of day :unsure:

Cleaned the cobwebs off, pumped the tyres up & went up & down the back alley twice to the sound of the missus p1ssing herself laughing at me! Knackered! :blush: lol.

Might go to the shop on it today.

Don`t wanna do too much too soon :lol:

(btw....got my own back on the missus. Told her my bike was named after her. She was gutted when i pointed to the word 'KRAKKEN' down the side :tu:)

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Managed to get up onto the top of hergest ridge (any mike oldfield fans will know of it) a few times this year, just trying to increase the distance each time.

Currently riding a Carrera Fury. Bought it as it was the best reviewed mtb on bike radar within my budget. Really liking the look of the 2011 boardman pro though. Just wish my employer offered the halfords scheme as I could get it for just over £500 instead of £1000 then.

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Mixed views out there on Boardman cycles. Plenty of folk with good experience but also some horror stories. Cycle club friend of mine has one which has been no end of trouble.

Check some cycling forums for the best opinions.

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I think a lot of the issues are down to halfords Paul.

I've seen some awful set ups come out of halfords. You can't beat the spec of the boardman for the price. Also now running a 20 speed gearing system. Looks like it the future in mtb.

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I'm having a few problems with my rear tyre, had 3 punctures this year. Is that normal?

Got stuck in Preston on Monday had no repair kit.

Three punctures in a year? I pitched up at work about a year with both tubes punctured, then the back one went on the way home!

You can also buy kevlar strips (or other material) which fit inside the tyre between it and the inner tube. I've not had a puncture since putting them in (touching wood now.)

A tip I was given is once a week turn the bike over and check the tyres for bits if glass, stone & metal embedded in them. Flick then out with a small screwdriver. It takes five minutes but saves them working their way towards the inner tube.

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I think a lot of the issues are down to halfords Paul.

I've seen some awful set ups come out of halfords. You can't beat the spec of the boardman for the price. Also now running a 20 speed gearing system. Looks like it the future in mtb.

Yes I think that's very true. Problem is that once purchased it takes a bit of courage to pop into the local bike shop and ask them to sort out the Halfords mess!!!!

Beautiful morning here, really looking forward to today's club run. Moved myself up to the A group last week. First ride and we head off to Bowland Knotts - google it - I had no idea what this meant. Came close to death on the ascent from the Lancashire side but a fabulous descent into Settle on the Yorkshire side.

Ricky I'd no idea Hergest Ridge existed till you posted it!! Do you MTB up there?

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Three punctures in a year? I pitched up at work about a year with both tubes punctured, then the back one went on the way home!

You can also buy kevlar strips (or other material) which fit inside the tyre between it and the inner tube. I've not had a puncture since putting them in (touching wood now.)

A tip I was given is once a week turn the bike over and check the tyres for bits if glass, stone & metal embedded in them. Flick then out with a small screwdriver. It takes five minutes but saves them working their way towards the inner tube.

Those strips sound like a good idea, does it not affect the performance though?

I've only been out a dozen times and haven't had the confidence to complete a serious ride.

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Ricky I'd no idea Hergest Ridge existed till you posted it!! Do you MTB up there?

I do indeed Paul. It's part of Offas Dyke and the views are absolutely stunning from up there. Really impressive.

I'll have to take some pics next time

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Those strips sound like a good idea, does it not affect the performance though?

SAS, I don't think so, the strips sit between the tyre & the inner tube, so I'm thinking that they may just add a couple of grams to the weight of the bike. I can't see any reason why they should affect performance (apart from preventing punctures - which must be a plus.)

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