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[Archived] So what makes a good manager?


beerwins

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Seeing as the owners and SS have the ability to spot a gem and that is why they are looking at up and coming coaches and so on it makes me wonder how they select these gems from the dobbers.

The ability to manage a team in my opinion is not just a guy who is tactically aware and adept to other teams tactics it's about presence, stature, man management, the abiltity to make tough decisions and stick by them, he has to be liked but be firm, there are loads of qualities a man has to have to make him a good manager and just picking some random coach because of ties with Rovers or how well he coaches the youth team has no bearing at all on how he will fettle as overall boss.

Obviously it all depends on an individual taste and how certain people are inspired but I look at Ferguson, here is a guy who uses all his backroom team (I mean people dont really believe managers sit in front of dvd's of the other teams recent matches) to help him with tactics, and he concentrates on selecting the right squad and man managing the team, I would say 80% of Fergusons managerial skill is his stature and how he handles the team on the night. If I was to compare him to say AVB they are complete different ends of the spectrum, AVB has no presence or stature and does'nt look like he could command the respect from players underperforming, but he appears to be very tactically aware.

I dont rate coaches as managers either, I think it's a coaches job to be pally pally with the players, pick them up when they are down, progress the player and so on, the players really wont hold a lot of respect for the coach as an authoritative figure as he would always just be one of the lads.

Just curious what other people look for in a manager, because some seem ecxited at the prospect of Shearer or Sherwood (maybe not Mckinley) where as others including myself would go for experience first.

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a good manager is someone who first and foremost knows how to will football matches, he should know how to change a game tactically or substitution wise, he should be able to make the fans feel a part of the club (something that kean never did) he should show passion on the touchline, he should be able to tell it like it is in interviews, he should be able to spot a player and show that player that he wants him to be a part of the club, he shouldnt take kean from anyone, he should be able to motivate players on matchdays, in other words he should be ian holloway!!!

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Tactics/team selection, man management and transfer record are the three key tenets of being a great club manager for me.

The problem with coaches becoming managers is that they often are good tactically, however struggle with man management as they've never been top dog and don't have much experience in the transfer market either.

One thing that should never be thought of as a primary reason is "he will get Ewood buzzing again" like what's been said by many on here of certain inexperienced managers as the main reason they should be appointed.

That's absolute twaddle, if the three big factors I've mentioned and other small factors are taken care of, the team will win matches and the fans will be buzzing again. If the inexperienced manager isn't so good at those things, the club will lose matches and the buzz will disappear fast.

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Point is that nobody is entirely sure. Look at the majority of mnagrs and it's not just about their talent, eye for a player, tactical awareness etc. There's a huge element of right time, right conditions involved. Look at Allardyce or souness at Newcastle. Look at Curbuishley at Charlton. Look at Hodgson at Rovers. The list of decent managers at the wrong place at the wrong time and therefore failing goes on. Equally the list of those managers who just find their niche and therefore do well, often the same guys is endless. A good manager is the one that suits you and your purposes and situation at the time. There are bad managers who fail everywhere and great managers who you fell could go into any club and do a good job, but your ordinarily good ones need the right situation to do it.

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Point is that nobody is entirely sure. Look at the majority of mnagrs and it's not just about their talent, eye for a player, tactical awareness etc. There's a huge element of right time, right conditions involved. Look at Allardyce or souness at Newcastle. Look at Curbuishley at Charlton. Look at Hodgson at Rovers. The list of decent managers at the wrong place at the wrong time and therefore failing goes on. Equally the list of those managers who just find their niche and therefore do well, often the same guys is endless. A good manager is the one that suits you and your purposes and situation at the time. There are bad managers who fail everywhere and great managers who you fell could go into any club and do a good job, but your ordinarily good ones need the right situation to do it.

That is in essence exactly what I am saying...there really is no way of knowing how one given manager will be at a certain club because each club varies, that is why when it comes to looking at what is best when you appoint a new man you need the most experienced guy picking that manager.

Shebby wants to pick the man that is going to lead us on this year and then get better and better, the only problem with that there is that if a new guy gets us promoted other clubs will snatch him, if he does'nt get us promoted how long will the V's give him before they pull the trigger?

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Without exception all great managers have been inspiring leaders. That is the main criteria IMO. You can surround yourself with scouts and coaches but no one but the manager can motive and inspire tha players and that is what separates the great from the rest. Look at Clough for example. He had Taylor to identify his players, he did little at the training ground and yet he was a great manager. All down to man management and leadership. That's why caches struggle to step up as they haven't been used to leading in their previous jobs. Hartford, kidd and Kean........need I go on.

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Without exception all great managers have been inspiring leaders. That is the main criteria IMO. You can surround yourself with scouts and coaches but no one but the manager can motive and inspire tha players and that is what separates the great from the rest. Look at Clough for example. He had Taylor to identify his players, he did little at the training ground and yet he was a great manager. All down to man management and leadership. That's why caches struggle to step up as they haven't been used to leading in their previous jobs. Hartford, kidd and Kean........need I go on.

Nope, exactly the point I was making, coaches may well have the man management and in some cases may learn to develop it but are rarely given the time unless they go down the leagues and start from the bottom.

The culture in India seems to be respect playing heroes and therefore they make good managers, that would never happen here, imagine two players discussing what Shearer had said about them on MOTD whilst training then the next day he turns up as manager....Would he get their respect? That is why he was doomed to fail at keeping the geordies up, I watched the last game when they needed to win against Villa I think, they had no passion or desire at all to win the game, that was appointment to keep the fans on board and this is what Shebby is trying to do.

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Let's not forget that SAF hasn't always been successful @ Old Trafford. It took him six seasons to win the League, which was their main ambition.

Luck can also play a part; Howard Kendall was reputedly on the verge of being sacked during his first spell at Everton but then their form turned the corner and he went on to great things.

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Tactics/team selection, man management and transfer record are the three key tenets of being a great club manager for me.

The problem with coaches becoming managers is that they often are good tactically, however struggle with man management as they've never been top dog and don't have much experience in the transfer market either.

One thing that should never be thought of as a primary reason is "he will get Ewood buzzing again" like what's been said by many on here of certain inexperienced managers as the main reason they should be appointed.

That's absolute twaddle, if the three big factors I've mentioned and other small factors are taken care of, the team will win matches and the fans will be buzzing again. If the inexperienced manager isn't so good at those things, the club will lose matches and the buzz will disappear fast.

Point is that nobody is entirely sure. Look at the majority of mnagrs and it's not just about their talent, eye for a player, tactical awareness etc. There's a huge element of right time, right conditions involved. Look at Allardyce or souness at Newcastle. Look at Curbuishley at Charlton. Look at Hodgson at Rovers. The list of decent managers at the wrong place at the wrong time and therefore failing goes on. Equally the list of those managers who just find their niche and therefore do well, often the same guys is endless. A good manager is the one that suits you and your purposes and situation at the time. There are bad managers who fail everywhere and great managers who you fell could go into any club and do a good job, but your ordinarily good ones need the right situation to do it.

These 2 posts combined = my opinion.

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