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4 minutes ago, den said:

We don’t even own much of it.

We clearly need to grow it then, we can’t do that whilst we play by EU rules.

If I was a remainer, signing up to EU rules would be a betrayal, surely you can see that?

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Simply put, without the NHS: I'd never have been born (I'm an IVF baby). I'd have died in the womb (as did the triplets I was supposed to be part of). I'd have died at some point immedi

And I’m going to have a Spanish beer from a Belgian glass, wearing an Italian band t-shirt ordered from a German website, and listening to some Bulgarian europop. You and the rest can stick Brexi

I didn't really want to get involved in this thread again, as emotions are very high, but I can't stand by and continue to be abused without putting my side across.  I'll try and quantify my view

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5 minutes ago, Gav said:

We clearly need to grow it then, we can’t do that whilst we play by EU rules.

If I was a remainer, signing up to EU rules would be a betrayal, surely you can see that?

We need to grow the U.K. market in snuff production as well, but it wouldn’t be my focus for when we leave.

Why fishing? That’s my question and no ones answered yet. Much as no one has yet told us remainers how the U.K. will be better off after brexit.  Why aren’t you focussing on how the huge finance centre will be so much better after we leave? 
 

Ive given you the answer -  in the absence of leavers not knowing why they focus so much on such a tiny industry. 

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Why can't the EU just play fair? That has always been the British way. From the Empire onwards. We have tried to help anyone and everyone without a thought about ourselves and they all just treat us in such a beastly way. It's enough to give you an island mentality. 

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The problem with fishing it's a finite resource, you can't grow it in the same manner you would another resource. The limits currently set are around sustainability, and because of that you are never going to be able to pull an infinite amount of fish from the sea

 

Edited by Jimbo
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28 minutes ago, den said:

We need to grow the U.K. market in snuff production as well, but it wouldn’t be my focus for when we leave.

Why fishing? That’s my question and no ones answered yet. Much as no one has yet told us remainers how the U.K. will be better off after brexit.  Why aren’t you focussing on how the huge finance centre will be so much better after we leave? 
 

Ive given you the answer -  in the absence of leavers not knowing why they focus so much on such a tiny industry. 

Its long been dismissed on here as unimportant, irrelevant, a side show, but that couldn't be further from the truth.

Fishing is actually the single most important point on Brexit as we post here now, thats why the focus is on fishing, the sides seem miles a part.

If we are to get a deal, fishing rights/quotas will have been agreed upon, otherwise its a no deal Brexit.

Simple as that.

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Of course she is lying.

1) This brilliant Trade Deal allows British taxpayers to subsidise Japanese car companies to stay in the UK which they were going to do if the UK had stayed in the EU. Even so Honda are pulling out, Nissan have switched some production to Japan and there is a big ? over Toyota without the European supply chain or market

2) The deal for services which is what we sell to Japan is decidedly worse than the EU- Japan trade deal we were previously party to.

3) The Treaty includes the term pari parsu in respect of the EU which means it can only be as good as or worse then the EU-Japan deal but never better

 

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Deutsche Bank analysts estimate that the costs to trade between Britain and the European Union will be high even if the two sides manage to strike a deal by the end of the year because of the impact of non-tariff barriers.

"Tariffs make up only a small part of the direct trade cost from leaving the EU," the analysts wrote in a note.

"Of more significance is the prevalence of non-tariff barriers. These will weigh on trade regardless of whether the UK and EU trade on preferential terms or not," they said.

Deutsche Bank expects Britain to agree on a Canada-style trade deal with the bloc in the coming weeks, which is referred to as a Free Trade Agreement (FTA).

Such a deal would knock 0.6% off Britain's gross domestic product (GDP) with a cost of 0.2% to the EU's GDP, the analysts said.

Malta, Luxembourg and Ireland will be the hardest hit in Europe from the Brexit costs, while the "big four euro area economies will all face below-average costs", they said.

However, "while in any other year, the trade shock from Brexit would likely result in a yearly contraction, we expect both the UK and EU economies to grow next year, deal or no deal," the analysts said.

That's because the trade costs "are small compared to the rebound expected from the economic recovery associated with coming out of lockdown", they said.

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We threw Deutsche Bank out of Malta- bunch of crooks.

Malta stands to gain 5% in GDP from either NoDeal or slim to non-existent Deal.

35 UK companies have relocated here and De La Rue who had been planning to concentrate production in the UK is instead shutting down in the UK and concentrating production in Malta instead. And, lord help us, Bet365 are moving to Malta.

Yes if you simply look at the static situation of the UK being in the single market one day and cast into outer darkness the next then yes Malta loses 1.7% of GDP because a bunch of idiots 2,000 km away voted Brexit.

But the world isn't like that. People take action to mitigate their losses and we are doing very nicely from decisions to come here irrespective of the problems we have had and are now sorting out. 

 

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On 24/10/2020 at 03:23, Gav said:

Its long been dismissed on here as unimportant, irrelevant, a side show, but that couldn't be further from the truth.

Fishing is actually the single most important point on Brexit as we post here now, thats why the focus is on fishing, the sides seem miles a part.

If we are to get a deal, fishing rights/quotas will have been agreed upon, otherwise its a no deal Brexit.

Simple as that.

Really good info for you here Gav. Why oh why does Britain never take the long view and invest. Whether its rail or fishing we just hand it all over to foreigners.

Taking back control!!!!!!!!

Britain at fault for Brexit fishing woes

Why are boats from the continent catching so much fish in British waters? Because we sold them our quotas

Sun 25 Oct 2020 16.00 AEDT

A fishing boat off Tynemouth.  A fishing boat off Tynemouth. Photograph: Owen Humphreys/PA

Your interesting article did not explain why so much fish in British waters is now caught by boats from other EU countries (“Brixham fishermen hope Brexit will tip the scales for shrinking industry”, Business). In the late 1980s, grants from Europe were made available for fishing communities to modernise their boats and tackle. This funding had to be match-funded by national governments. Other governments supplied this funding, unlike the UK. The result was that British fishermen were unable to compete with the bigger, more efficient boats, and many sold their quota to French, Spanish or Dutch fishing companies. The quotas were introduced to preserve fish stocks.

The reason the future of fishing is so fraught in the Brexit negotiations is that other European nations paid British fishermen to be able to fish for what had been British quotas.
Veronica Hardstaff, MEP for Lincolnshire 1994-1999 and former member of the European parliament fishing committee, Sheffield

 
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Daniel Hannan has just enlightened us remainers on the unseen advantages of fishing. An advantage worth risking no deal for. 
 

Take a look at his reasons....

”Fishing is currently a tiny fraction of our economy. But there is vast growth potential in using fish in cosmetic and health supplements. Bones, scales, guts, heads, enzymes - almost all can be monetised. Hull and Grimsby could be reborn as pharma hubs.”

?

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Hannan has come out with some ridiculous statements all through the Brexit process.

This "pivot to Asia" is one such nonsense. It probably escaped his attention that the Chinese CP’s 5th plenum opened recently with No 1 on the agenda:promoting "Chinese self sufficiency and trade withdrawal"

So just as we go "Global Britain" the world's second biggest economy is looking inward. We won't get anything out of Biden either. He dislikes Johnson and as an Irish-American has one eye on a possible no-deal Brexit and its implications for Ireland.

The Brexit madness continues

 

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Taking back control-
 
"£ has lost 17%of its value against the dollar and 13% against the euro relative to pre-referendum averages. Indeed, £ has become so volatile that Bank of America observed in a recent note that it is trading more like an emerging market currency": Brexit. https://thetimes.co.uk/article/for-britain-to-prosper-the-prime-minister-urgently-needs-a-strategy-l0h2xt2zn
 
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23 minutes ago, philipl said:
Taking back control-
 
"£ has lost 17%of its value against the dollar and 13% against the euro relative to pre-referendum averages. Indeed, £ has become so volatile that Bank of America observed in a recent note that it is trading more like an emerging market currency": Brexit. https://thetimes.co.uk/article/for-britain-to-prosper-the-prime-minister-urgently-needs-a-strategy-l0h2xt2zn
 

@philipl

I've just had a meeting with Credorax in Valletta - Brexit did come up, I was looking for you in the background eating a Lampuki pie :P

Edited by Gav
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18 hours ago, Gav said:

@philipl

I've just had a meeting with Credorax in Valletta - Brexit did come up, I was looking for you in the background eating a Lampuki pie :P

See your DM. I was probably waving at you from the rocks across Marsamxett Harbour..

Sorry we have just switched on the thundery rain for you if you are still here- managed to get my morning swim in before the clouds rolled in.

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Latest Brexit nonsense...

Because companies suddenly need Customs expertise, they are hoovering up senior Customs officers.

Government now finding it has got nobody to train the 50,000 new Customs officers they have just started to recruit. 

Brexit- the famous British sense of absurd humour turned into a whole country. 

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More bits dropping off the UK

 
When I flagged up some months ago that Gibraltar was effectively seeking EU membership - people said this was ridiculous.... "Gibraltar would like to become part of Europe’s Schengen free-movement area & eventually the EU’s customs union".
 
 
 
 
 
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Labour challenges trade minister Liz Truss's lies on the "groundbreaking, Brexit-shaped"  new UK-Japan trade deal. 

The facts:  it delivers 0.07% boost to UK GDP while  83% of additional bilateral trade accrues to Japan.

https://www.ft.com/content/da027670-fb09-4a58-b213-bcd025f69d7c

The UK mostly trades services, few of which are any use to Japan. They mostly sell us manufactured goods that we buy in substantial amounts.  It always stood to reason that the Japanese would benefit most from this. 

The UKs competitors are delighted by the lucrative opportunities Brexit gives them.

 

 

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