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Jacob Rees-Mogg, leader of the House of Commons, said on Thursday the government was moving as quickly as it could to tackle the border disruption, quipping:

“The key is that we’ve got our fish back! They’re now British fish and they are better and happier for it.” 

With twits like this in government, what chance does the country have? 

Edited by jim mk2
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2 hours ago, jim mk2 said:

Jacob Rees-Mogg, leader of the House of Commons, said on Thursday the government was moving as quickly as it could to tackle the border disruption, quipping:

“The key is that we’ve got our fish back! They’re now British fish and they are better and happier for it.” 

With twits like this in government, what chance does the country have? 

I thought your spelling was better than that Jim.

😁😁😁😁

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Story will be breaking tonight

GOVERNMENT PLAN TO RIP UP UK WORKERS' RIGHTS

 

Worker protections enshrined in EU law — including the 48-hour week — would be ripped up under plans being drawn up by the government as part of a post-Brexit overhaul of UK labour markets. 

The package of deregulatory measures is being put together by the UK’s business department (Beis) with the approval of Downing Street, according to people familiar with the matter. It has not yet been agreed by ministers — or put to the cabinet — but select business leaders have been sounded out about the plan.

The proposed shake-up of regulations from the “working time directive” will delight many Tory MPs but is likely to spark outrage among Britain’s trade union leaders.

The move would potentially mark a clear divergence from EU labour market standards but the UK would only face retaliation from Brussels under the terms of its new post-Brexit trade treaty if the EU could demonstrate the changes had a material impact on competition.

The main areas of focus are on ending the 48-hour working week, tweaking the rules around rest breaks at work and not including overtime pay when calculating some holiday pay entitlements, according to people familiar with the plans.

The government also wants to remove the requirement of businesses to log the detailed, daily reporting of working hours, saving an estimated £1bn.

The government insisted that any reforms would be designed to help both companies and their employees — and put to a full consultation — saying it had no intention of “lowering” workers’ rights. 

“The UK has one of the best workers’ rights records in the world,” a government spokesperson said. “Leaving the EU allows us to continue to be a standard setter and protect and enhance UK workers’ rights.”

But Ed Miliband, Labour’s business secretary, said the proposals were a “disgrace” at a time when so many people were worried about their jobs. 

“In the midst of the worst economic crisis in three centuries, ministers are preparing to tear up their promises to the British people and taking a sledgehammer to workers’ rights,” he said. 

“Workers in the UK are the primary beneficiaries of the very positive judgments of the European courts,” said an official at the Trades Union Congress, adding that any attempt to “whittle down and narrow” the interpretation of European law “is a concern because it amounts to a diminution of rights”.

EU officials have said that decisions on whether to trigger tariffs and other “rebalancing measures” against the UK under the recently-signed post-Brexit trade deal would depend on the practical effects of policy decisions.

Brussels has often highlighted labour market standards as a core issue for the “level playing field” that the deal is meant to uphold, but regulation of working time at EU level is patchy, with Brussels seeking repeatedly to shore up how the directive is applied. Britain, along with many EU countries, opted out from enforcing the 48-hour limit on the working week as a member state.

The government points out that the UK often “gold plates” EU minimum standards — such as offering 5.6 weeks of annual leave compared with the EU requirement of 4 weeks. 

But in a call with 250 leading business figures earlier this month, prime minister Boris Johnson urged industry to get behind plans for future regulatory liberalisation after Brexit — to the delight of many free marketeers in his cabinet.

Matt Kilcoyne, deputy head of the free market Adam Smith Institute, welcomed the proposals — saying the current “one size fits all” 48-hour rule was a “straitjacket on the economy”.

Yet there will be nerves at the top of government about how a shake-up of employment rights will be received among low-paid working class voters who backed the Tories in northern “Red Wall” seats in the December 2019 general election. 

A change in the calculation of holiday pay could be “a significant monetary loss” for a low paid worker often forced into overtime to make ends meet, the TUC official said.

It is also not clear that business, which is already adjusting to Brexit and battling the fallout from the Covid-19 pandemic, is currently clamouring for a fundamental overhaul of workers’ rights.

Mark Fox, chief executive of the Business Services Association, said his members wanted reforms that “enhance stability” rather than cause disruption. “We are also mindful of the prime minister’s call to ‘level up’ and that must always mean improving the environment in which people work.”

Adam Marshall, director-general of the British Chambers of Commerce, said the immediate priority for business after Brexit was to focus on developing a stable trading relationship with the EU. Any deregulatory dividend was likely to come in emerging sectors such as fintech or health tech, he added.

Colin Leckey, partner in employment law at Lewis Silkin, said employers would welcome the UK rejecting new European case law requiring the detailed, daily reporting of working hours.

However, any move to overturn recent European case law on holiday pay — which stipulates that sales commissions and overtime must be taken into account in its calculation — would be more contentious. 

Michael Ford, a barrister and professor at Bristol university, said much of the complexity employers faced in calculating holiday pay was the result of domestic legislation, rather than the judgments of the ECJ, although UK employers also disliked the ECJ’s stance in principle.

Unions have brought a series of cases on the underpayment of holiday entitlements and employers would love to see them overturned, Mr Leckey said. 

 

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We told brexiteers about fishing and we told them about the reality of what the “red tape” that they wanted to abolish, actually was. It was and is workers rights.

 

Edited by den
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Well, it didn't take long did it? Barely 2 weeks since we left the EU and long-held promises have been broken. What a surprise.

But wasn't this the plan all along? The wealthy managers and owners who run the Conservative party and the ideologues in the ERG and other right wing groups have been waiting years to do this. 

"Britons never, never, never will be slaves."

It won't be long. 

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I’ll believe it when I see it 

By the sounds of it is staying clear of the tracking of work hours, something brought by a Spanish company against a German bank, which sounds a pretty big administration task if you employed say 50 people or more. 
 

It would be political suicide to cut holidays or entitlement straight after Brexit. Can’t see it happening. 
 

You could always opt out of the 48hr working week anyway and most do. 
 

Govt have denied it - but that means f all nowadays - but cannot see a significant decline in workers rights ever coming to pass. Besides, we exceeded EU standards when in the EU so we didn’t need to leave to go back on them. Unless you are insinuating they will go below them standards set, which begs the question why we ever exceeded them in the first place? 

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1 hour ago, jim mk2 said:

Well, it didn't take long did it? Barely 2 weeks since we left the EU and long-held promises have been broken. What a surprise.

But wasn't this the plan all along? The wealthy managers and owners who run the Conservative party and the ideologues in the ERG and other right wing groups have been waiting years to do this. 

"Britons never, never, never will be slaves."

It won't be long. 

As if anyone can believe a word they say. Labour should send a team of people to Red Wall voters and explain on the doorstep what is happening. Turn those seats around and Labour is half way there.

Poor workers, deluded and deceived--- glad I'm not one.

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  • Backroom
48 minutes ago, Dreams of 1995 said:

I’ll believe it when I see it 

By the sounds of it is staying clear of the tracking of work hours, something brought by a Spanish company against a German bank, which sounds a pretty big administration task if you employed say 50 people or more. 
 

It would be political suicide to cut holidays or entitlement straight after Brexit. Can’t see it happening. 
 

You could always opt out of the 48hr working week anyway and most do. 
 

Govt have denied it - but that means f all nowadays - but cannot see a significant decline in workers rights ever coming to pass. Besides, we exceeded EU standards when in the EU so we didn’t need to leave to go back on them. Unless you are insinuating they will go below them standards set, which begs the question why we ever exceeded them in the first place? 

That's the only reason it worries me tbh.

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8 hours ago, Dreams of 1995 said:

I’ll believe it when I see it 

By the sounds of it is staying clear of the tracking of work hours, something brought by a Spanish company against a German bank, which sounds a pretty big administration task if you employed say 50 people or more. 
 

It would be political suicide to cut holidays or entitlement straight after Brexit. Can’t see it happening. 
 

You could always opt out of the 48hr working week anyway and most do. 

The EU working directive (48hrs) was never policed and never adhered to, it was nothing more than a tick box exercise, some workers have been exploited for years in that area under 'EU rules'. The union didn't want to touch it because it meant members couldn't work overtime, it was a nonsense, many will be glad its gone.

The pandemic will change the working landscape forever, I know companies that will never return to the office model, councils will sell off buildings because staff can work remotely. I also know a couple of companies that don't work Fridays, they already have a 3 day weekend.

Times are changing, water down workers rights makes for great headlines, but companies don't need government approval to change working conditions as the points raised above clearly shows. 

 

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Of the FT
 
In other #Brexit news German logistics giant has suspended shipments from EU to UK until further notice - following

last week. /1

 

 
 
Image
 
Image
 
 
That's a pretty head spinning list of requirements. A senior logistics expert I know who is in regular touch with Whitehall Departments says: "The government is rattled and putting pressure on the Civil Service to find solutions." 2/ENDS
 
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I dont see removing the 48 hour week as a big issue, was it ever really policed? 

I think the bigger issue could be the link between overtime and holiday pay, I'd be interested to see the details of this as that could potentially be open to abuse. 

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Two weeks in and workers rights are under threat. A directive that protects the right of a worker to refuse to work more than 48hrs taken away and the suggestion of a lowering of holiday pay.

Who gains from that, the employer or employee?

Its only the beginning.

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47 minutes ago, Gav said:

The EU working directive (48hrs) was never policed and never adhered to, it was nothing more than a tick box exercise, some workers have been exploited for years in that area under 'EU rules'. The union didn't want to touch it because it meant members couldn't work overtime, it was a nonsense, many will be glad its gone.

The pandemic will change the working landscape forever, I know companies that will never return to the office model, councils will sell off buildings because staff can work remotely. I also know a couple of companies that don't work Fridays, they already have a 3 day weekend.

Times are changing, water down workers rights makes for great headlines, but companies don't need government approval to change working conditions as the points raised above clearly shows. 

 

SO,if employers could ignore EU directives because it was never policed why did we need to leave the EU?

 

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2 minutes ago, 47er said:

SO,if employers could ignore EU directives because it was never policed why did we need to leave the EU?

 

Because 17.4m people voted to leave, did you miss it?

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55 minutes ago, gumboots said:

If they'd not been lied to, some of them wouldn't though.

Yes thats probably true.

Brexit for many was about much more than is acknowledged by the small band of posters on here, they may not feel they were never lied to at all, I wouldn't want to speak for them personally.

We must never forget, this site is in no way reflective of society at large, the majority voted from Brexit, the majority vote the Tories in election after election , the small majority of here continually find themselves on the wrong side of the arguments nationally.

But I'm comfortable with that, my values are important, but I do accept most people around me don't share my views.

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2 hours ago, philipl said:
Of the FT
 
In other #Brexit news German logistics giant has suspended shipments from EU to UK until further notice - following

last week. /1

 

 
 
Image
 
Image
 
 
That's a pretty head spinning list of requirements. A senior logistics expert I know who is in regular touch with Whitehall Departments says: "The government is rattled and putting pressure on the Civil Service to find solutions." 2/ENDS
 

I worked for an export company for twenty years. Thankfully, most of the vehicle components we sent abroad (mainly to non EU countries) were paid for up front before we shipped.

For some of our customers though, we had to get involved with letters of credit/documentary credits and similar banking documents, often having to provide proof of origin paperwork, commodity codes and other documents highlighted in Phil’s example above.

Trust me, it can be a ‘red tape’ nightmare and I can well imagine long delays when the required paperwork or documents contain errors and have to be submitted again.

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