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Thought I would offer an insight into the School Meal Voucher scheme being used to provide vouchers to those parents and children that need it desperately.  The scheme is provided by Edenred a co

This sermon is brought to you by the Daily Mail. Victim-blaming repugnant nonsense. 

You need to completely change your perspective. Do you think they don’t realise how dangerous is?  They don’t have other options. Of course it’s dangerous but the alternative, for most, is l

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33 minutes ago, jim mk2 said:

Hit the north's economy and refused to help hungry schoolchildren...... surefire vote winners with the Red Wall. 

Osborne and Cameron attacked people on low incomes, plunged children into poverty, attacked disabled benefits, messed up universal credit and imposed a bedroom tax, all in the name of austerity.

Proved to be a vote winner :blink:

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4 hours ago, chaddyrovers said:

Isn't it the parents responsible to feed them? Yes some parents do need extra financial help and that's why we seen Increase in welfare payments have happened to help less well off families. Those payments will keep increasing aswell

But there is also issues that need tackling this problem like this one

1. Making mum and dad pay child maintenance after all they are parent to this child at the end of the day. So they need to take responsibility for the actions? Take two people to tango in the end. Do you agree? 

2. Also when school vouchers were provided to a number of parents were using them to buy alcohol or computer consoles with them during lockdown restrictions? Was that for children or themselves? I've been told of this from several different sources. Surely this is wrong and should be stop? 

3. Also given parents better training with cooking lessons as some parents do not know how to cook unless it is something done in microwave or hot water for pot noodles or super noodles. Do you agree? 

4. Reducing teenage pregnancies and give better information to them to schools with career advice, financial advice, etc. Do you agree?

As a general policy, yes I agree with what you say. In the middle of a pandemic, however, it's out of touch nonsense. Particularly point number 2 which is drivel taken straight from page 13 of the Sun.

Some things do need a sticking plaster WHILE the wider problem is sorted out.

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Jeremy (H)unt a multi millionaire who was delighted at saving a few quid on his lunch at tax payers expense, yet he doesn't worry about school children not being able to eat. Not to mention the fact that this man was Health Secretary at the time of Exercise Cygnus and he failed to act on that meaning that this country was totally unprepared for a pandemic. To quote Angela Rayner 'scum'.

Edited by Ewood Ace
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Just now, Ewood Ace said:

Jeremy (H)unt a multi millionaire who was delighted at saving a few quid on his lunch at tax payers expense, yet he doesn't worry about school children not being able to eat. Not to mention the fact that this man was Health Secretary at the time of Exercise Cygnus and he failed to act on that meaning that this country being totally unprepared for a pandemic. To quote Angela Rayner 'scum'.

He should be called Isaac.

Shameful doesn't do him justice.

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Out of Chaddy's 4 pts he has suggested: 1) Making parents pay their fair share. 2) Punishing those parents that manipulate the welfare system for their own benefit. 3) Providing parents with home economic skills (especially important if you are a 17 year old parent). 4) Education to prevent teenage pregnancy.

Can someone point out to me why this is such a heartless comment?

All of this is besides the point, in particular because he said "but there is also issues that need tackling", because those recommendations alone aren't enough to stave the hunger of children. 

It begs belief that we are now in a position as a country (5th most advanced in the world) where we are having to actually seriously consider feeding families over school holidays. My parents made enormous sacrifices when I was younger - I am the child of teenage parents, one jobless the other enjoyed a rave and a football match at the time - but I can honestly say I was never hungry growing up. When I was born they did what all adults should do and grow up. Times have changed massively in them years if my parents could survive and now parents can't. I don't think parents have got any less caring, so the next logical step is to look at the finances of the working-class.

1) Higher rents / house costs.

2) Stagnated wages, zero hours contracts, job losses (Covid)

3) Higher cost of living - food, toiletries, childrens "luxuries" (you try telling a child he can't have a PS5 when all of his friends have one, or that he can't attend the £250.00 school trip)

4) Higher costs of 'adult' luxuries, ie: tobacco, alcohol. This is all part of our social make up and to try and deny poor people the access to this is pretty elitist.

So in reality the crux of the matter is stagnant wages because if these had gone up in line with the rest adults could still afford the lives they had in the 90s along with feeding their kids.

The only problem is that once you start feeding these children it validates the parents' behaviour. It's a real tricky situation, the easy step is to just throw money at it and start picking up the slack but the welfare state of the early 2000s shown us that once you start to facilitate behaviour like that it becomes a natural part of peoples' lives. I know of families I grew up with whose mothers took with both hands from the state, the children had a nice flat screen tele but frozen food every night. Changing those habits is more important than it is plugging the gaps, but we must also be careful not to let children slip through the net in our attempts to change those habits. On this basis I'd be supportive of feeding children in non-school times but only temporarily, with a review happening every school year to see if the situation around food poverty / general poverty has improved. It might give people the kick up the arse they need in government to actually level up the working class.

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The Tories have obviously found the magic money tree when they found £12bn for their failed track and trace and £500m for the Eat Out to Help Out.

So how do they justify not providing relatively small amounts to feed hungry poor children over Christmas? And before the people who shout about "it's the parents responsibility" that is true to some extent but why should children go hungry through no fault of their own? 

Should those children be put into care, which would cost significantly more? Should we stop giving free education and leave it up to the responsibility of parents?

We literally are waiting for fires to happen and trying to extinguish them, instead of planning ahead to prevent fire occurring in the first place. 

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32 minutes ago, Dreams of 1995 said:

Out of Chaddy's 4 pts he has suggested: 1) Making parents pay their fair share. 2) Punishing those parents that manipulate the welfare system for their own benefit. 3) Providing parents with home economic skills (especially important if you are a 17 year old parent). 4) Education to prevent teenage pregnancy.

Can someone point out to me why this is such a heartless comment?

Nothing inherently wrong with any of those points. You shouldn't have a child if you cant afford it or know how to look after it, benefit cheats should be punished. But theres an under tone of ALL struggling parents being waste of space benefit cheats who dont care about their kids. 

I'm sure a lot of these parents are making a lot of sacrifices to do the best for their kids and many are now being forced to make a sacrifice of 20% of their already quite low salary. The least we could do is help them out with food. 

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6 minutes ago, RoverDom said:

Nothing inherently wrong with any of those points. You shouldn't have a child if you cant afford it or know how to look after it, benefit cheats should be punished. But theres an under tone of ALL struggling parents being waste of space benefit cheats who dont care about their kids. 

I'm sure a lot of these parents are making a lot of sacrifices to do the best for their kids and many are now being forced to make a sacrifice of 20% of their already quite low salary. The least we could do is help them out with food. 

Exactly. Don't forget Chaddy made all these points in defence of a Tory MP voting against free school meal vouchers. In other words there was more than an undertone of ALL parents being like this, it was heavily implied and scarcely below the surface. 

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Just now, Blue blood said:

Exactly. Don't forget Chaddy made all these points in defence of a Tory MP voting against free school meal vouchers. In other words there was more than an undertone of ALL parents being like this, it was heavily implied and scarcely below the surface. 

In response to the Tory decision to vote against providing basic nutrition to England's most vulnerable kids during the school holidays, one Tory woman suggested that the problem has nothing to do with an economy-wrecking pandemic hitting after a decade of Tory austerity cuts, but is actually caused by "lazy parents".

Her solution was that the parents of starving hungry kids should "forage apples".

Presumably Chaddy is out now in his orchard picking up windfalls

 

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31 minutes ago, Blue blood said:

Exactly. Don't forget Chaddy made all these points in defence of a Tory MP voting against free school meal vouchers. In other words there was more than an undertone of ALL parents being like this, it was heavily implied and scarcely below the surface. 

It's the same old story, flog the idle poor but the idle rich can do as they please.

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5 minutes ago, lsp82 said:

The scheme is provided by Edenred a company with links to Ministers and donors of the Conservative Party. They were awarded the contract without tender for a huge sum of money (over 100 million pounds).

Thank you again for fascinating insight from the front line.

The above sentence sums up this fraudulent government in a nutshell. People deride Third World nations for nepotism and corruption and incompetence but this country is no different and in many ways far worse. 

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27 minutes ago, lsp82 said:

Thought I would offer an insight into the School Meal Voucher scheme being used to provide vouchers to those parents and children that need it desperately. 

The scheme is provided by Edenred a company with links to Ministers and donors of the Conservative Party. They were awarded the contract without tender for a huge sum of money (over 100 million pounds).

The scheme has been beset by problems since day 1 with schools having difficulty getting onto the site to input parents emails so that they can receive their code which allows them to redeem at supermarkets. I myself have been up all night in the first 3 months trying to get access and I know of lots more heads who have been in the same boat.

Now in response to the issue of using the vouchers to buy alcohol, cigarettes, PS5s etc. This I am afraid is nonsense the vouchers/ecard that parents receive can only be used for food and groceries anything else and it will be automatically refused. However if a parent does a shop and buys food groceries and alcohol they can use the vouchers to pay for the food and groceries but will have to pay for the alcohol out of their own pocket. It is all done electronically so parents cannot persuade supermarkets staff to just put it through. 

The issue of whether these families need it or deserve it is a complicated one as with any society there are parents who neglect their children when it comes to looking after them and use what money they have on other things. However my view is no child in a first world country should ever go hungry no matter the reason. These children don't choose that and certainly shouldn't be punished for it. 

Then there are those families that in this unprecedented time need that extra support. I see on a daily basis two parent and single parent families that due to job loss, waiting for UC, extortionate rents, higher cost of living etc are literally not eating for 2or 3 days a week so they can pay the electricity or so there children can have regular meals. I have seen parents ask to join their child at breakfast club so they can eat that day. These are real decisions being made by parents every day. Many are embarrassed and ashamed to have to ask for help but have no other option. These are the families school meal vouchers can and do help. 

My school in one of the most deprived areas in the country and in the northwest has been out in the community since March visiting families of children of the school and seeing the desperation out there even in families who have a parent or both parents working. 

Their circumstances do not in any way mean that they are bad parents who shouldn't have had children, I find they are some of the best parents who are doing what any parent would and sacrificing for their children. In many cases it is only by circumstance they are where they are. This could happen to any family at any time. All it takes is the loss of a job, longterm illness to end up on a spiral downwards.

We all need to be thankful that we aren't in the situation some families find themselves in, but at the same time realise that as human beings we need to support these families because one day it could be us or someone we know.

Thanks for your posts Isp82. They are the most insightful I have seen on here and whilst some are sad to read they expose Britain for what it is after ten years of Tory rule.

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4 hours ago, Mike E said:

As a general policy, yes I agree with what you say. In the middle of a pandemic, however, it's out of touch nonsense. Particularly point number 2 which is drivel taken straight from page 13 of the Sun.

Some things do need a sticking plaster WHILE the wider problem is sorted out.

Point 2 wasn't taken from any page of the Sun newspaper which I don't buy. Clearly you know what it is page 13. Several different parents have told me about this. 

3 hours ago, Dreams of 1995 said:

Out of Chaddy's 4 pts he has suggested: 1) Making parents pay their fair share. 2) Punishing those parents that manipulate the welfare system for their own benefit. 3) Providing parents with home economic skills (especially important if you are a 17 year old parent). 4) Education to prevent teenage pregnancy.

Can someone point out to me why this is such a heartless comment?

Because it was me thats suggested it. Had it been someone else it wouldn't have created any problems on this forum. 

3 hours ago, Dreams of 1995 said:

My parents made enormous sacrifices when I was younger

As did mine. My dad working 60 to 70 hours a week, my mum working 30 to 40 hours a week. Some days I would only seen either parent a couple of hours a day at best. They make huge sacifices back then but I totally understand why they did it. They protect me from it, But it was great spending so much time with my nan and uncles bringing me up tho. Proper close family unit. I have some great memories from them like baking raspberry buns with my nan. 

3 hours ago, Dreams of 1995 said:

The only problem is that once you start feeding these children it validates the parents' behaviour. It's a real tricky situation, the easy step is to just throw money at it and start picking up the slack but the welfare state of the early 2000s shown us that once you start to facilitate behaviour like that it becomes a natural part of peoples' lives. I know of families I grew up with whose mothers took with both hands from the state, the children had a nice flat screen tele but frozen food every night. Changing those habits is more important than it is plugging the gaps, but we must also be careful not to let children slip through the net in our attempts to change those habits. On this basis I'd be supportive of feeding children in non-school times but only temporarily, with a review happening every school year to see if the situation around food poverty / general poverty has improved. It might give people the kick up the arse they need in government to actually level up the working class.

I totally agree about the welfare state from the early 2000's under Labour government that facilitate this behaviour of having a children so young and the state would pay and support you by giving you a house, money, food and etc. Its a culture that does now coming down on by better education, financial management, making children understand that they are better off having a college or university education then finding a job in that find then, better understanding of the sex education and not feeling the pressure of having a sex at such a early age to prove a point to friends or group of people. 

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7 hours ago, Gav said:

In one part of Accrington surrounding Bullough Park, a shocking 77% of children are estimated to be living in poverty - the worst in the county’

Yes it has been one of the worst area but Gav it has been like that for the past 20 years. It isn't something that has just happened in the past couple of years. I know the area very well 

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55 minutes ago, lsp82 said:

Now in response to the issue of using the vouchers to buy alcohol, cigarettes, PS5s etc. This I am afraid is nonsense the vouchers/ecard that parents receive can only be used for food and groceries anything else and it will be automatically refused. However if a parent does a shop and buys food groceries and alcohol they can use the vouchers to pay for the food and groceries but will have to pay for the alcohol out of their own pocket. It is all done electronically so parents cannot persuade supermarkets staff to just put it through. 

Well I have no reason not to trust the people who have told me the stories has they witness first hand at the store. 

 

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2 hours ago, chaddyrovers said:

I totally agree about the welfare state from the early 2000's under Labour government that facilitate this behaviour of having a children so young and the state would pay and support you by giving you a house, money, food and etc. Its a culture that does now coming down on by better education, financial management, making children understand that they are better off having a college or university education then finding a job in that find then, better understanding of the sex education and not feeling the pressure of having a sex at such a early age to prove a point to friends or group of people. 

People have had children young for generations, centuries. In fact, they were encouraged and expected to have their children young. It was the social norm and still is for many people. There are very good reasons why people should still have the children at a young age and not when they are older, which increases the risks of health problems and sometimes, abnormalities.

The welfare state gives basic protection to the those in need. It is not and never has been a way of life for most people.   

Edited by jim mk2
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13 minutes ago, chaddyrovers said:

Point 2 wasn't taken from any page of the Sun newspaper which I don't buy. Clearly you know what it is page 13. Several different parents have told me about this. 

Because it was me thats suggested it. Had it been someone else it wouldn't have created any problems on this forum. 

As did mine. My dad working 60 to 70 hours a week, my mum working 30 to 40 hours a week. Some days I would only seen either parent a couple of hours a day at best. They make huge sacifices back then but I totally understand why they did it. They protect me from it, But it was great spending so much time with my nan and uncles bringing me up tho. Proper close family unit. I have some great memories from them like baking raspberry buns with my nan. 

I totally agree about the welfare state from the early 2000's under Labour government that facilitate this behaviour of having a children so young and the state would pay and support you by giving you a house, money, food and etc. Its a culture that does now coming down on by better education, financial management, making children understand that they are better off having a college or university education then finding a job in that find then, better understanding of the sex education and not feeling the pressure of having a sex at such a early age to prove a point to friends or group of people. 

You strike me as the type of person who reads A Christmas Carol and thinks that Scrooge started good and ended evil or you would read Oliver Twist and think that Mr Bumble is the hero of the book. I bet you'd love to see a return to a Dickensian times with kids sent to the workhouse or up a chimney.

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Just now, Ewood Ace said:

You strike me as the type of person who reads A Christmas Carol and thinks that Scrooge started good and ended evil or you would read Oliver Twist and think that Mr Bumble is the hero of the book. I bet you'd love to see a return to a Dickensian times with kids sent to the workhouse or up a chimney.

Never read any of them or watch the movies. 

No I want children to have the education and then go into college or university education or into apprenticeships. Build a career for themselves. Whether it's a nurse, fitness instructor or builder or roofer or HGV driver. Enjoy their late teens and 20's with their friends by having night outs, holidays, etc

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14 minutes ago, chaddyrovers said:

Well I have no reason not to trust the people who have told me the stories has they witness first hand at the store. 

 

They are completely unredeemable against alcohol and cigarettes . If a shop includes a packet of cigarettes the vouchers will only cover the acceptable items . At first people found ways but the consequences for the shops make it not worth the bother . Trust me I speak to a a client a day at least who asks leading questions about it or has tried it . 

Ultimately you are the sort of person who is arguing against supporting the needy in difficult times . So let’s leave it at that 

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1 minute ago, chaddyrovers said:

Never read any of them or watch the movies. 

No I want children to have the education and then go into college or university education or into apprenticeships. Build a career for themselves. Whether it's a nurse, fitness instructor or builder or roofer or HGV driver. Enjoy their late teens and 20's with their friends by having night outs, holidays, etc

Slight tangent , it’s hard to work out what your  cultural points of reference are ...... ewood ace couldn’t have gone more well known or mainstream 

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5 minutes ago, Inglorious basturk said:

They are completely unredeemable against alcohol and cigarettes . If a shop includes a packet of cigarettes the vouchers will only cover the acceptable items . At first people found ways but the consequences for the shops make it not worth the bother . Trust me I speak to a a client a day at least who asks leading questions about it or has tried it . 

Ultimately you are the sort of person who is arguing against supporting the needy in difficult times . So let’s leave it at that 

They are also only able to be used in selected Supermarkets (your big 6) not in any old shop. This is because they use an e-card not actual vouchers.

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