Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 9.6k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Thought I would offer an insight into the School Meal Voucher scheme being used to provide vouchers to those parents and children that need it desperately.  The scheme is provided by Edenred a co

This sermon is brought to you by the Daily Mail. Victim-blaming repugnant nonsense. 

You need to completely change your perspective. Do you think they don’t realise how dangerous is?  They don’t have other options. Of course it’s dangerous but the alternative, for most, is l

Posted Images

Budget at a glance, the main points:

  • Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) predicts economy will return to pre-Covid levels by the middle of 2022, six months earlier than previously though.
  • OBR forecast economy will grow this year by 4 per cent, by 7.3 per cent in 2022, then 1.7 per cent, 1.6 per cent and 1.7 per cent up to 2025 
  • Unemployment now expected to peak at 6.5 per cent, down from 11.9 per cent expected in July 2020 forecast, meaning 1.8million fewer people out of work.  
  • Furlough scheme extended to the end of September under current 80 per cent of salary rate. 
  • Employers asked to pay 10 per cent in July, then 20 per cent in August and September. 
  • Support for self-employed also goes on until September. 
  • £20 Universal Credit uplift remains in place for another six months. 
  • Apprentice grants for employers doubled to £3,000.
  • £5billion fund for Restart Grants for businesses. Retailers will get up to £6,000 per site from April. Hospitality and leisure open later and will be able to claim up to £18,000.
  • New recovery loan scheme for businesses of £25,000 to £10million, 80 per cent guaranteed by the Government.
  • Business rate holiday in place until June and discounted for the remaining nine months of 2021-22 financial year. 
  • 5 per cent VAT rate for hospitality extended to September, then at 12.5 per cent until April 2022 before returning to 20 per cent regular rate.
  • Stamp Duty holiday extended until June for homes worth up to £500,000, then phased back in. 
  • Mortgage guarantee scheme for those with 5% deposit to boost home sales.
  • UK's total public spending bill estimated at £407billion. 
  • The UK has borrowed £355billion - 17 per cent of GDP - the highest since the Second World War.
  • No income tax, VAT or national insurance rises.  
  • Tax free income threshold will rise to £12,570 next year and then frozen until 2026.
  • Higher rate threshold rises to £50,270 next year and then frozen until 2026. 
  • Corporation Tax increased to 25 per cent in 2023.
  • Small Profit Rate of 19 per cent set up for small businesses. 
  • Inheritance tax thresholds, pensions lifetime allowance, and annual exempt amount in capital gains tax maintained at current levels until April 2026.
  • Alcohol duty frozen.
  • Fuel duty frozen. 
Link to post
Share on other sites

Pork barrel politics at its worst is alive in the UK shows the government's so-called "levelling up" agenda and commitment to correcting regional inequality is just a meaningless slogan and a con.

Wealthy towns such as Canterbury, Lewes, Richmond (Sunak's seat) and Newark (Jenrick's seat) in category 1 high priority for government infrastructure funds while struggling deprived areas like Salford, Barnsley and Sheffield in category 2.

The separate Towns Fund for England confirmed it has £1bn in cash for 45 areas. Of these, 40 have a Conservative MP.

https://www.ft.com/content/215ce50f-8bc1-455d-a3fb-5cfb33932b14

As for the pathetic Budget, no other leading industrialised nation is putting up taxes. Tory ideology triumphs again over the needs of the economy and desperate need for investment in R&D and reform of CGT, IHT and property taxes .

Funnily enough there was absolutely no mention in the Budget of the higher growth and new opportunities afforded by Brexit.

I wonder why?

All is not lost though. We have signed a trade deal with Kenya. 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Happy that the budget contain additional 10 million pounds for Armed Forces veterans with mental health needs. 

9 hours ago, Gav said:

Budget at a glance, the main points:

  • Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) predicts economy will return to pre-Covid levels by the middle of 2022, six months earlier than previously though.
  • OBR forecast economy will grow this year by 4 per cent, by 7.3 per cent in 2022, then 1.7 per cent, 1.6 per cent and 1.7 per cent up to 2025 
  • Unemployment now expected to peak at 6.5 per cent, down from 11.9 per cent expected in July 2020 forecast, meaning 1.8million fewer people out of work.  
  • Stamp Duty holiday extended until June for homes worth up to £500,000, then phased back in. 
  • Mortgage guarantee scheme for those with 5% deposit to boost home sales.
  • No income tax, VAT or national insurance rises.  
  • Fuel duty frozen. 

Good news that our economy will recover back to previous levels so quickly. 

Unemployment keep much lower than predictions forecast

Lower deposits for mortgages is great news for people who want out of the rental sector and buy the first home. 

Conservatives kept the manifesto pledge of no income tax,VAT and national insurance rises during this parliament. 

No rise in fuel duty will protect families incohe and jobs in transport sector 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, chaddyrovers said:

Conservatives kept the manifesto pledge of no income tax,

Technically yes but in reality no as theyve frozen personal allowances which means in real terms it's a tax increase over 4 years. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, chaddyrovers said:

Happy that the budget contain additional 10 million pounds for Armed Forces veterans with mental health needs. 

Good news that our economy will recover back to previous levels so quickly. 

Unemployment keep much lower than predictions forecast

Lower deposits for mortgages is great news for people who want out of the rental sector and buy the first home. 

Conservatives kept the manifesto pledge of no income tax,VAT and national insurance rises during this parliament. 

No rise in fuel duty will protect families incohe and jobs in transport sector 

 

This article shows which groups do well out of the budget. Those with children and on low pay or who are unemployed fare worst.

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2021/mar/03/budget-2021-what-it-means-incomes-tax-benefits

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, chaddyrovers said:

Good news that our economy will recover back to previous levels so quickly. 

The UK economy has been the worst hit of any industrlalised nation as a result their mishandling of the pandemic and is forecast to be below 2019 levels in 2022-23.

That isn't "good news".  In fact it's economically illiterate

Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, jim mk2 said:

The UK economy has been the worst hit of any industrlalised nation as a result their mishandling of the pandemic and is forecast to be below 2019 levels in 2022-23.

That isn't "good news".  In fact it's economically illiterate

The economy will take years and years to get back to normal, if it ever does. It won't be the 2019 normal, that's for sure.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Tyrone Shoelaces said:

The economy will take years and years to get back to normal, if it ever does. It won't be the 2019 normal, that's for sure.

The Tories have another 4yrs to try and improve things from an economic perspective, but yes TS its a long road back.

Thats what a once in a lifetime global pandemics can do to you, but I'm more than happy to pay more tax to support the bailout. 

 

Edited by Gav
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Tyrone Shoelaces said:

The economy will take years and years to get back to normal, if it ever does. It won't be the 2019 normal, that's for sure.

Highest tax rate in 50 years, according to the Times

And they say Labour is the high tax party

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, chaddyrovers said:

Happy that the budget contain additional 10 million pounds for Armed Forces veterans with mental health needs. 

Good news that our economy will recover back to previous levels so quickly. 

Unemployment keep much lower than predictions forecast

Lower deposits for mortgages is great news for people who want out of the rental sector and buy the first home. 

Conservatives kept the manifesto pledge of no income tax,VAT and national insurance rises during this parliament. 

No rise in fuel duty will protect families incohe and jobs in transport sector 

 

It comes to something when the Government can celebrate that they expect unemployment will onkly go up less than they last predicted.

Economic recovery is obviously only a forecast rather than a guarantee but the nature of the Covid-19 downturn is that the economy should recover quickly as many businesses will be able to get back to work quickly and there is pent-up economic demand from those lucky enough to have saved over the last year.

The lower deposits for mortgages is good news but it's tempered by the extension of the stamp duty discount which is very silly. It was brought in on the assumption that the housing market would otherwise slow down because of the pandemic. Instead it has caused a rapid house price rise, exactly the opposite of the intention and extending it will only exacerbate this, putting house prices in many areas out of the reach of first time buyers.

As RoverDom points out there will be a significant rise in income tax in the next 5 years, just not in the income tax rate - semantics.

The failure to increase fuel duty is a terrible policy. It is encouraging more car use at a time when we have to get our CO2 emissions down, encourages use of petrol and diesel cars at the expense of electric cars and it directly discriminates in favour of car drivers at the expense of rail and bus passengers, whose fares continue to rise, often ahead of inflation.

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, chaddyrovers said:

Good news that our economy will recover back to previous levels so quickly. 

Talk about economic mismanagement. The Tories have been in government sine 2010 and in 23, 24 and 25 we are predicted to have 3 successive years with growth under 2%. There's not much good about that. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

If in doubt pump up the housing market - it's been Tory party ideology or decades. Help to Buy is probably the worst housing market scam of all, is a complete waste of tax payer money which is disproportionately skewed to the benefit of developers . It's already been scrapped in Scotland

High property prices (and therefore rents) are the primary cause of in-work poverty, inequality and low social mobility. Property prices should be actively deflated to a sensible multiple of average earnings using higher property taxes, which would also offer the opportunity for lower taxes for those on low incomes. 

Instead we have the political right actively inflating property prices, which is a bit like using taxpayer money to deliberately inflate the price of food while children are going hungry. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, jim mk2 said:

Wealthy towns such as Canterbury, Lewes, Richmond (Sunak's seat) and Newark (Jenrick's seat) in category 1 high priority for government infrastructure funds while struggling deprived areas like Salford, Barnsley and Sheffield in category 2.

The separate Towns Fund for England confirmed it has £1bn in cash for 45 areas. Of these, 40 have a Conservative MP.

Starmer's far too polite. It's more than "fishy", it stinks

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-56281774

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, jim mk2 said:

The UK economy has been the worst hit of any industrlalised nation as a result their mishandling of the pandemic and is forecast to be below 2019 levels in 2022-23.

That isn't "good news".  In fact it's economically illiterate

Jim, We have been over and over this time after time why our economy was hit so hard. Cos our country is over 80% service based industry led country. We shut down our economy down in March 2020 so this was to be expected surely. clearly you didn't or want to?

2 hours ago, Gav said:

The Tories have another 4yrs to try and improve things from an economic perspective, but yes TS its a long road back.

Thats what a once in a lifetime global pandemics can do to you, but I'm more than happy to pay more tax to support the bailout. 

 

We all have to pay more tax to get the deficit down and back to manageable level. 

55 minutes ago, only2garners said:

 

The failure to increase fuel duty is a terrible policy. It is encouraging more car use at a time when we have to get our CO2 emissions down, encourages use of petrol and diesel cars at the expense of electric cars and it directly discriminates in favour of car drivers at the expense of rail and bus passengers, whose fares continue to rise, often ahead of inflation.

I disagree as Rail and Bus transport arent ideal for people who work night shifts or no close transport links close to where they work. Plus the time it would take me to get to work. Currently its a 20 mins journey and usinmg any form of public transport would add signification time to my journey of over a hour each time.  

42 minutes ago, jim mk2 said:

If in doubt pump up the housing market - it's been Tory party ideology or decades. Help to Buy is probably the worst housing market scam of all, is a complete waste of tax payer money which is disproportionately skewed to the benefit of developers . It's already been scrapped in Scotland

High property prices (and therefore rents) are the primary cause of in-work poverty, inequality and low social mobility. Property prices should be actively deflated to a sensible multiple of average earnings using higher property taxes, which would also offer the opportunity for lower taxes for those on low incomes. 

Instead we have the political right actively inflating property prices, which is a bit like using taxpayer money to deliberately inflate the price of food while children are going hungry. 

Didn't Blair and Brown pump up the Housing market when the Labour were in power? 

The roof was bound to fall in on Labour's housing market (telegraph.co.uk)

What is average rent per month and average property prices in Blackburn area Jim? 

Would you be saying this if you owned a number of property and rent them out or buy them and redecorate them to sell them for a profit?

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, chaddyrovers said:

I disagree as Rail and Bus transport arent ideal for people who work night shifts or no close transport links close to where they work. Plus the time it would take me to get to work. Currently its a 20 mins journey and usinmg any form of public transport would add signification time to my journey of over a hour each time.  

That looks horribly like me, me, me Chaddy.

Of course some journeys are tricky with public transport. But equally many people cannot afford their own transport or are unable to drive for health reasons and are therefore reliant on public transport. Why should they be effectively subsidising car drivers? Petrol was on average 129.9p a litre in 2010. 11 years later it's about 10p a litre LESS than that. In the meantime train fares have gone up by about DOUBLE the inflation rate. How is that going to encourage people to cut their carbon emissions?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, only2garners said:

That looks horribly like me, me, me Chaddy.

Of course some journeys are tricky with public transport. But equally many people cannot afford their own transport or are unable to drive for health reasons and are therefore reliant on public transport. Why should they be effectively subsidising car drivers? Petrol was on average 129.9p a litre in 2010. 11 years later it's about 10p a litre LESS than that. In the meantime train fares have gone up by about DOUBLE the inflation rate. How is that going to encourage people to cut their carbon emissions?

No its just normal working people lives. I work in Preston area just off Junction 31a on the M6. Its a 20 minutes journey each time. why would anyone want to have longer travel journey time then needed? I wouldnt want that. 

Plus driving was always something I wanted to do from a early age and give me more job opportunities from it.

Plus it depends on the car you drive aswell on the Carbon emissions surely? Some manufacturers are better than others. 

Plus what about people who don't want to use public transport due to personal choice?

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, chaddyrovers said:

Jim, We have been over and over this time after time why our economy was hit so hard. Cos our country is over 80% service based industry led country. We shut down our economy down in March 2020 so this was to be expected surely. clearly you didn't or want to?

The reason we've had the worst peacetime economic downturn since 1709 - THREE HUNDRED YEARS - is because your beloved government deliberately allowed the virus to spread like wildfire in the early stages, then provoked further outbreaks with Sunak's absurd £850 million Eat Out To Help Out bribery scheme last summer, and Johnson's obsession with encouraging people to socially mix at Christmas.

Three  lockdowns and 120,000 plus people condemned to premature deaths deaths later, the Tories have tanked the economy so badly that the government borrowed an all-time record of £355 billion in 2020-21, which equates to 17% of GDP! In 2021-22 the projected rate of borrowing is £234 billion, which is still over 10% of GDP.

This is the worst economic performance of any leading industrialised nation

 

12 minutes ago, chaddyrovers said:

Didn't Blair and Brown pump up the Housing market when the Labour were in power? 

The roof was bound to fall in on Labour's housing market (telegraph.co.uk)

Whatabbouttery from 2008 - is that the best you can offer ???

Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, chaddyrovers said:

I disagree as Rail and Bus transport arent ideal for people who work night shifts or no close transport links close to where they work. Plus the time it would take me to get to work. Currently its a 20 mins journey and usinmg any form of public transport would add signification time to my journey of over a hour each time.  

The rail and bus systems in this country are a bloody disgrace. The bus system seems to get worse by the year and nearly 60 years on the rail system is still crippled by Beeching. I've been to a lot of countries and I haven't been to any nation that is of a decent international standing that has a rail system that is as bad as ours. 

Edited by Ewood Ace
Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, chaddyrovers said:

No its just normal working people lives. I work in Preston area just off Junction 31a on the M6. Its a 20 minutes journey each time. why would anyone want to have longer travel journey time then needed? I wouldnt want that. 

Plus driving was always something I wanted to do from a early age and give me more job opportunities from it.

Plus it depends on the car you drive aswell on the Carbon emissions surely? Some manufacturers are better than others. 

Plus what about people who don't want to use public transport due to personal choice?

 

Clearly carbon emissions are greater with some cars than others. But we have to move away from fossil fuels towards electric vehicles and increasing the fuel duty is a simple and fair way to push people quicker towards that. Those with better fuel efficiency will be less affected by fuel duty increasing than those with gas guzzlers. But all are being unfairly subsidised by public transport users and those who rarely use either through general taxation.

Of course people can have personal choice but why should people who choose to drive a car be subsidised by all those who can't or choose not to drive? 

As Ewood Ace says public transport is an absolute disgrace in the UK, decades behind most other developed (and many less developed) European countries. It's a bit better in London but that's been because of greater funding at the expense of the rest of the country. One of the simplest ways to ease the lives of the poor in the UK would be to greatly improve bus services and bring down fares.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.