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7 hours ago, Darrenbot said:

Maybe some of the older fans should be invited onto the podcast to talk about the great Rovers teams from way back.

I’ve made a number of requests over the years & the few that replied have been featured in past episodes. 
 

The invitation is always open to anyone who thinks they have something of interest...just DM me on here & we can work something out ??

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13 hours ago, Tyrone Shoelaces said:

I bet Danny Blanchflower hated playing against Bryan Douglas, he got run ragged every time. I'll say this about Danny, he never resorted to under hand tactics with Bryan in spite of getting the run around. Maybe he just couldn't get close enough ! I've seen Dougie come off with his shirt being ripped on several occasions. That old vee neck was ideal for players trying to pull him back after he'd gone past them. Brian O'Neil  at the dingle dome and Frank McKlintock at Ewood spring to mind. Two good players but they weren't averse to a bit of manhandling.

The torture of Danny Blanchflower by Bryan Douglas continued after 1960 Tyrone. Druggies ran him absolutely ragged again in rovers 7-2 home game hammering in 1963.

Lets not forget, Blanchflower was seen as a Spurs great and that Spurs team of 1960 was also seen as a great team. In 1960/61 they won the double. 

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14 minutes ago, den said:

The torture of Danny Blanchflower by Bryan Douglas continued after 1960 Tyrone. Druggies ran him absolutely ragged again in rovers 7-2 home game hammering in 1963.

Lets not forget, Blanchflower was seen as a Spurs great and that Spurs team of 1960 was also seen as a great team. In 1960/61 they won the double. 

I was there Den. My abiding memory is of Blanchflower looking back over his shoulder to see where Bryan had gone once he'd beaten him for the umpteenth time. I think that was the game when Bill Nicholson decided Danny had finally run his race and it was time to find a successor, which they did in Alan Mullery.

We'd beaten them easily the preceding May at Ewood 3-0 when before the game they paraded the " European Cup Winners Cup " that they'd just won around the ground. That was Matt Woods final game for the club before he emigrated to Australia. Being the final home game there was the usual invasion of small boys at the end of the match and I got to slap Matt and a few others on the back as they went off.

There's a photo somewhere of Matt being presented with a leaving gift from the directors after the game - a canteen of cutlery !

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1 minute ago, Tyrone Shoelaces said:

I was there Den. My abiding memory is of Blanchflower looking over his shoulder to where Bryan had gone once he'd beaten him for the umpteenth time. I think that was the game when Bill Nicholson decided Danny had finally run his race and it was time to find a successor, which they did in Alan Mullery.

We'd beaten them easily the preceding May at Ewood 3-0 when before the game they paraded the " European Cup Winners Cup " that they'd just won around the ground. That was Matt Woods final game for the club before he emigrated to Australia. Being the final home game there was the usual invasion of small boys at the end of the match and I got to slap Matt and a few others on the back as they went off.

There's a photo somewhere of Matt being presented with a leaving gift from the directors after the game - a canteen of cutlery !

Yeah, saw both games as well Tyrone. Fabulous.

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8 minutes ago, Tyrone Shoelaces said:

I was there Den. My abiding memory is of Blanchflower looking back over his shoulder to see where Bryan had gone once he'd beaten him for the umpteenth time. I think that was the game when Bill Nicholson decided Danny had finally run his race and it was time to find a successor, which they did in Alan Mullery.

We'd beaten them easily the preceding May at Ewood 3-0 when before the game they paraded the " European Cup Winners Cup " that they'd just won around the ground. That was Matt Woods final game for the club before he emigrated to Australia. Being the final home game there was the usual invasion of small boys at the end of the match and I got to slap Matt and a few others on the back as they went off.

There's a photo somewhere of Matt being presented with a leaving gift from the directors after the game - a canteen of cutlery !

I was at Matt’s final game. I remember it mainly for getting accidentally whacked in the face with a rattle as I climbed over the wall with all the other kids to get on the pitch. By the time I got home a huge lump had appeared over my eye and my mum was convinced I must have been in a fight and threatened to stop me going to Ewood again. 
I’ve had a lot more painful visits since then without getting hit in the face, but still go back for more. That’s life being a Rovers supporter, I guess.

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22 minutes ago, A Northern Horde... said:

Did they parade the ECWC at Ewood Tyrone..never knew that.

Yeah, before the game. They ran around the running track with it to really good applause. First British team to win a major European trophy. It felt more of a British achievement then with a team full of English, Irish, Scots and Welsh players.  We all identified more with British teams in Europe then. I remember watching the final, they absolutely hammered a very good Spanish team, Athletico Madrid ?, about 5-1. Spurs then were like Liverpool or City are today, full of class players. Everyone an international apart from the right back, Peter Baker. I always felt sorry for him but England caps had to be earned then and Jimmy Armfield was England's right back and captain at the time.

After we'd let them parade the cup Rovers absolutely took them to the cleaners winning in a stroll. They'd no answer to our attacking play, We'd 3 young local lads playing 8,9,10 that night in Byrom, Pickering and Ferguson that were unstoppable. I remember walking away from the ground thinking " With those three up front the future is really bright ".  Dougie was playing on the right wing for once so Danny Blanchflower probably thought he was in for a quiet night, until Fergie got running with the ball !

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11 hours ago, renrag said:

Thanks Tony! It’s often just a case of finding the trigger to bring them back to mind. I think I’m the only one left of the dozen or so who went to that particular match together. It was so much better going to away games then. No segregation, fans mixing and chatting before and after games, without any trouble. In fact in the next round at Burnley, we pulled a 3 goal deficit back in the last 17 minutes. I travelled there and back on the train, packed with both sets of fans, and there was plenty of banter but no aggravation. 

In those days home fans and away fans used to change ends either at kick off or at half time to stand behind the goals their teams were attacking, never any trouble.

What would happen if rovers were at home tomorrow against Burnley and the fans crossed on the riverside? Wouldn’t be pretty would it ?.

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1 hour ago, den said:

In those days home fans and away fans used to change ends either at kick off or at half time to stand behind the goals their teams were attacking, never any trouble.

What would happen if rovers were at home tomorrow against Burnley and the fans crossed on the riverside? Wouldn’t be pretty would it ?.

I was about 12 when I first started going on my own to Ewood. There was a group of much older teenage girls that I used to see on the Riverside. A few of them had hand knitted scarves, half in Rovers colours and half in Burnley colours, with the names of their favourite players picked out in contrasting threads, Peter Dobing, Ray Pointer etc. They obviously went to Ewood one Saturday and Turf Moor the next. Imagine that now.

I had a group of about 5 mates who played for the school football team. All of us had teams we supported. Me Rovers, a pal Burnley, other two Everton and Blackpool, one lad 'City. After playing on Saturday morning it'd be " Where are we going this afternoon ? " We didn't bother going home to get changed or anything. We'd always go to a local game, Rovers, Bolton, Burnley, Utd, City, Bury, Oldham. I managed to twist their arms to come to Ewood pretty often. The team of the early 1960's was very easy on the eye for the neutral.

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Yeah @Tyrone Shoelaces I went on Ewood obviously, but PNE with a mate very regularly. Also went to watch Burnley a few times in the days of Leighton James, Paul Fletcher, etc.

A question for anyone. When I mentioned fans changing ends, did it happen anywhere else because I can’t recall it happening on any other ground?

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1 hour ago, den said:

Yeah @Tyrone Shoelaces I went on Ewood obviously, but PNE with a mate very regularly. Also went to watch Burnley a few times in the days of Leighton James, Paul Fletcher, etc.

A question for anyone. When I mentioned fans changing ends, did it happen anywhere else because I can’t recall it happening on any other ground?

I think it did, It certainly did at Rochdale. When I went to a neutral " away " ground I wasn't particularly bothered about which team I watched so I tended to pick a spot and stay there. I believe the term for it was " migration ".

The first time I saw it disregarded was a game against Liverpool. Their lot had all been in the Blackburn End for the first half and at half time they all climbed over the boundary wall en masse and made their way directly down the pitch to take over the Darwen End !

There was always trouble when we played them. I was in the Blackburn End behind the goals in one game were we'd just taken a 3-2 lead after being 0-2 down at one point. A Rovers fan near me was celebrating enthusiastically when a really old guy stood next to him, who was obviously pissed up, just turned around and head butted him. Then it all kicked off.

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23 minutes ago, Tyrone Shoelaces said:

I think it did, It certainly did at Rochdale. When I went to a neutral " away " ground I wasn't particularly bothered about which team I watched so I tended to pick a spot and stay there. I believe the term for it was " migration ".

The first time I saw it disregarded was a game against Liverpool. Their lot had all been in the Blackburn End for the first half and at half time they all climbed over the boundary wall en masse and made their way directly down the pitch to take over Darwen End !

There was always trouble when we played them. I was in the Blackburn End behind the goals in one game were we'd just taken a 3-2 lead after being 0-2 down at one point. A Rovers fan near me was celebrating enthusiastically when a really old guy stood next to him, who was obviously pissed up, just turned around and head butted him. Then it all kicked off.

Surely not Tyrone? There must be some mistake here, Liverpool are always the victims remember.

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On ‎09‎/‎10‎/‎2020 at 12:17, oldjamfan1 said:

Surely not Tyrone? There must be some mistake here, Liverpool are always the victims remember.

The first time I went to Old Trafford I " Migrated " from one end to another at half time. No problem. A 3-0 win with another Bryan Douglas midfield masterclass.

In the relegation season of 1965-66 we got a 2-2 draw there. I was in the end opposite the Stretford End ( Scoreboard End then ? ) with the rest of the Rovers fans. Rovers got a corner and whilst everybody was waiting for it to be taken I saw one of those old dimpled pint glasses come sailing out from the back and it lands on the cross-bar ! Of course it shattered into loads of pieces of glass. The game was held up whilst the ground staff cleared the pitch. Nobby Stiles had to be held back by other players from going into the crowd to find out who had thrown it ! All the Rovers fans were telling him to " Come and get us " !

We were really poor that day and with about 10 minutes left we were 2-0 down and going nowhere. We eventually got a corner and as it came over the Utd keeper made a bee line for Mike England and just punched him in the head with the ball nowhere near. I think something had been going on throughout the game.  He didn't wait to be sent off, he just started walking off right away. Of course it was an obvious pen which Mike Harrison slotted away as per usual.

From being 2-0 down it was 2-1 and a man up, game on all of a sudden. With about 5 minutes left Paddy Crerand tripped Harrison about 30 yards from goal out on the left. Free kick. Crerand made the fatal error of walking away from the free kick with his back to the ball. Harrison tried to take the free kick really quickly before he was fully standing. He miss kicked the ball slightly and it hit Crerand on the back of his shoulder and looped gracefully over David Herd in the United goal. Hilarious. We'd really robbed a point. I was very quiet on a coach full of angry Mancs on the way back to Rochdale. 

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3 hours ago, den said:

In those days home fans and away fans used to change ends either at kick off or at half time to stand behind the goals their teams were attacking, never any trouble.

Question - how did it go from this to the dark hooliganism days just a few years later in the 70s and 80s? 

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3 minutes ago, frosty said:

Question - how did it go from this to the dark hooliganism days just a few years later in the 70s and 80s? 

it was a phase of youth behaviour,just like the mods and rockers of the 60`s,the hooliganism had largely ceased by the late 80`s when the acid house craze began and young lads decided it was preferable to hug everyone than be chased across a terrace with the threat of getting your head kicked in

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On match day mornings, my mates and I used to have a kick about at the side of The Fernhurst pub with two oak trees conveniently growing as goalposts. One Saturday, a group of Everton youths turned up and we thought there was going to be trouble. However, they asked if they could challenge us to a game which was, amazingly, played in a very friendly way. After about 45 mins we ended the game and the Everton lads thanked us for the game and wished us well for the season. I was amazed at how well they behaved, not like “typical Scousers” I had heard about. However, as they walked away they spotted a full crate of milk outside of the corner shop and promptly helped themselves to a pint or two each and walked off along Bolton Rd. 
They were “typical Scousers” after all. 
 

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32 minutes ago, Tyrone Shoelaces said:

The first time I went to Old Trafford I " Migrated " from one end to another at half time. No problem. A 3-0 win with another Bryan Douglas midfield masterclass.

In the relegation season of 1965-66 we got a 2-2 draw there. I was in the end opposite the Stretford End ( Scoreboard End then ? ) with the rest of the Rovers fans. Rovers got a corner and whilst everybody was waiting for it to be taken I saw one of those old dimpled pint glasses come sailing out from the back and land on the cross-bar ! Of course it shattered into loads of pieces of glass. The game was held up whilst the ground staff cleared the pitch. Nobby Stiles had to be held back by other players from going into the crowd to find out who had thrown it ! All the Rovers fans were telling him to " Come and get us " !

We were really poor that day and with about 10 minutes left we were 2-0 down and going nowhere. We got a eventually got a corner and as it came over the Utd keeper made a bee line for Mike England and just punched him in the head with the ball nowhere near. I think something had been going on throughout the game.  He didn't wait to be sent off, he just started walking off right away. Of course it was an obvious pen which Mike Harrison slotted away as per usual.

From being 2-0 down it was 2-1 and a man up, game on all of a sudden. With about 5 minutes left Paddy Crerand tripped Harrison about 30 yards from goal out on the left. Free kick. Crerand made the fatal error of walking away from the free kick with his back to the ball. Harrison tried to take the free kick really quickly before he was fully standing. He miss kicked the ball slightly and it hit Crerand on the back of his shoulder and looped gracefully over David Herd in the United goal. Hilarious. We'd really robbed a point. I was very quiet on a coach full of angry Mancs on the way back to Rochdale. 

Yes, I was there too.

 I was at OT in the early sixties when Rovers right back Keith Newton was up against a lively, very young outside left. George Best I believe his name was. He did okay for himself I guess? I’ve a feeling that might have been in Bests debut season of 1963. Remember seeing Best in that game - he really was something else. He could do the lot even at 17 years of age. 
 

 

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19 minutes ago, Riversider28 said:

On match day mornings, my mates and I used to have a kick about at the side of The Fernhurst pub with two oak trees conveniently growing as goalposts. One Saturday, a group of Everton youths turned up and we thought there was going to be trouble. However, they asked if they could challenge us to a game which was, amazingly, played in a very friendly way. After about 45 mins we ended the game and the Everton lads thanked us for the game and wished us well for the season. I was amazed at how well they behaved, not like “typical Scousers” I had heard about. However, as they walked away they spotted a full crate of milk outside of the corner shop and promptly helped themselves to a pint or two each and walked off along Bolton Rd. 
They were “typical Scousers” after all. 
 

That Liverpool game in the early Sixties when they invaded the pitch was the first time I'd seen anybody " Steaming ". About 20 to 30 Scouse teenage lads just piled into a little sweet shop near the ground and they came out loaded up with Kit-Kats and Mars bars etc, they must have emptied it !

 

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17 hours ago, renrag said:

Thanks Tony! It’s often just a case of finding the trigger to bring them back to mind. I think I’m the only one left of the dozen or so who went to that particular match together. It was so much better going to away games then. No segregation, fans mixing and chatting before and after games, without any trouble. In fact in the next round at Burnley, we pulled a 3 goal deficit back in the last 17 minutes. I travelled there and back on the train, packed with both sets of fans, and there was plenty of banter but no aggravation. 

You do wonder what it was that changed all that. Politics?

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20 minutes ago, Stuart said:

You do wonder what it was that changed all that. Politics?

Another thing that was great then was you could just walk on to 99% of games. Football was really accessible. Like I said earlier we'd decide at Saturday dinner time which game we were going to and just jump on the bus or train to wherever we fancied. For kids It was really cheap as well. I've been to 4 games in a week with my paper round money. Most weeks I'd go to two games. The coach firms in Rochdale were always running coaches to random games. I'd be going home from school past their booking offices and I'd see a coach going to England U-23's v Yugoslavia U-23's at Old Trafford, buy a ticket, dash home for some tea and then off to the game. It was a great time to be a young football fan.

 Imagine a Rochdale coach firm running a coach to a Blackburn V Spurs night match these days !

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when the premier league was formed they immediately set about marketing the game to the middle classes,the bigwigs at the top realised they spend more,don`t cause any trouble and don`t begrudge paying stupid prices for tickets and merchandise,it took a decade or so but they have succeeded,the game at the top is not a game of the working class anymore and the premier league do not give a flying **** about the rest of english football

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