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Having been somewhat surprised by the recent (yet apparently futile) return to management of the Big Fat Gum Chewer with West Brom, and considering the age of some of the current crop in the top two divisions in English football (e.g. Hodgson, Warnock) I got to thinking about what incentivises managers and how much are they actually paid for their work?

I know there appears to be 'an elite' in some parts of the system, but in the same way that many players seem to attract disgustingly high pay compared to ordinary folk in real jobs (teachers, medics, care workers, civil servants, retail workers etc), I wondered if anyone had any insights into the world of football manager pay and incentives.

After all, BFS appears to have bitten off more than he can chew this time at WBA (doomed!) and closer to home we appear to be lumbered with a slow-turning dinosaur (depending on which way the fan-wind is blowing)? What makes these people get out of bed in the morning, at all levels in football? Anyone got any reliable insights?

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I mean, how much is someone like TM paid for his weekly gurning antics? Does BFS wage actually cover his consumption of wrigley's finest? Can Pep afford a new beanie from time to time? Does Woy Hodgson need to clamber over Mrs Hodg in the mornings, or could (should) he comfortably retire at this point?

Surely someone has an idea of what the economics of football managership stack up like? C'mon now, don't be shy ūüėČ

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I doubt with people like Allardyce, Warnock or Hodgson it really comes down to cash. Of course it helps and in Allardyce's case the prospect of a huge bonus to keep a side up must be attractive rather than sitting around at home bored.

But they will all surely have more money than they will ever need by now. If they weren't all very good managers they would have likely retired years ago if they had been tradesmen or worked in industry.

No I think its a way of life that they just become addicted to and can't resist it.

Spending all day every day immersed in management for 20-30 years and being good at it must be like a drug. The adrenaline, pressure, adulation, being 'the boss', fans and players respecting you, proving people right or wrong. Spending your days out on the training ground having the fun and 'crack' of working with footballers every day. Probably beats sitting in the garden under lockdown.

Looks like a job too far for Allardyce and I was amazed he took it but again just don't think he can resist when a club rings him up and begs him to join them. Ego and money help.

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When football IS your life, you’re not likely to sit at home in retirement when opportunities are offered or there is still work going. 
I agree with JHRover, the likes of Hodgson and them are hardly still doing it as they need the cash. 
Look at Alex Ferguson still going to the majority of United games even during this time of pandemic. They can’t give it up, they have made it the meaning of their lives. 

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Can you put me in touch with the person who sells it?

Pay them per point IE 10 to 20k per point, with a minimum wage hourly rate as their basic. So 8.72?40 hours basic, regardless of time worked and shed loads of dollar for doing well.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I was clearing out some old emails the other day and came across a copy of Steve Kean's contract from when he was manager at Rovers.

He was on a basic salary of £1m for the 2011/12 season - with a £200k bonus if Rovers finished in the top 12.

The contract then goes on to state he'd earn £1.2m in 2012/13 if Rovers were still in the Premier League, or half of that if in the Championship.

He would have received a £500k bonus if Rovers were then promoted that season.

The contract even specifies what his salary would be should we be in League 1.

He also got a bonus of £200k for qualifying for the UEFA cup via league position and £200k for qualifying for the Champions League.

There was also bonus payments for progress in the FA Cup and League Cup (£100k for winning either, but also payments for making the semi finals).

The club also paid and additional 10.4% of his basic salary into his pension.

It's no wonder he hung around as long as he did.

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2 hours ago, LeftWinger said:

I was clearing out some old emails the other day and came across a copy of Steve Kean's contract from when he was manager at Rovers.

He was on a basic salary of £1m for the 2011/12 season - with a £200k bonus if Rovers finished in the top 12.

The contract then goes on to state he'd earn £1.2m in 2012/13 if Rovers were still in the Premier League, or half of that if in the Championship.

He would have received a £500k bonus if Rovers were then promoted that season.

The contract even specifies what his salary would be should we be in League 1.

He also got a bonus of £200k for qualifying for the UEFA cup via league position and £200k for qualifying for the Champions League.

There was also bonus payments for progress in the FA Cup and League Cup (£100k for winning either, but also payments for making the semi finals).

The club also paid and additional 10.4% of his basic salary into his pension.

It's no wonder he hung around as long as he did.

Wonder what's in Mowbray contract?

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