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On 04/04/2021 at 04:19, RoverDom said:

People in aldi who try and pack their bags at the checkout. 

I thought that was a game , beaten them a couple of times , packed* before the total amount came up on the card machine.

*Thrown in the bags

Hint to win: Make sure the last couple of items on the conveyor belt have the bar code scratched through or wrinkled so they have to enter it manually.

Edited by perthblue02
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That should be 'Posters'. 

The Missus and one of her colleagues invented one and chucked it into a meeting just to see if folk have any clue what they are waffling about...  ‘yeah so I think we need to rinse the octopus wi

People who say 'Droring' instead of 'Drawing'.  They say 'Droring Pin' and 'Back to the Droring Board'.  Yet the word is spelt and pronounced 'Drawing.'  Ex Radio 1 DJ and former Radio Lancs presenter

1 minute ago, perthblue02 said:

I thought that was a game , beaten them a couple of times , packed* before the total amount came up on the card machine.

*Thrown in the bags

That's acceptable. 

However if the customer wins that's a sign that staff standards have slipped and leads nicely to another bug bear that Aldi isn't what it used to be. 

How it should work is that the checkout assistant should be throwing it through at such a speed that only two thirds of the items are actually scanning and the customer should be literally sweeping items into their trolley just to keep up. By the time the amount to pay comes up the customer should be on the floor in a pool of their own sweat.

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I’ve become a proper pro at this during the last year. Get bags open and ready to accept goods. When they start scanning, get them all bagged up quickly, pay, then do one. I don’t drive to Aldi, as it’s so close to my house, so I don’t have the luxury of packing at the car....

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The word route pronounced as rowt

Did they get their kicks on rowt 66? no it was route 66

Took a sat nav back a few years ago because of this  even the British English voice setting did it. The shop assistant thought it was quite funny that I actually wanted to test a different brand in the shop  to see how it pronounced it.

Edited by perthblue02
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27 minutes ago, K-Hod said:

I’ve become a proper pro at this during the last year. Get bags open and ready to accept goods. When they start scanning, get them all bagged up quickly, pay, then do one. I don’t drive to Aldi, as it’s so close to my house, so I don’t have the luxury of packing at the car....

You sir are either someone who grinds my gears, or served by someone who grinds my gears. It shouldn't be physically possible to pack your bags at the till, Aldi staff used to be demi-gods with level 99 swipe speed. 

 

At my local Aldi the checkout assistant was having a chat with the customer whilst scanning, I almost went and gave him an application form for Sainsburys. 

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10 hours ago, perthblue02 said:

The word route pronounced as rowt

Did they get their kicks on rowt 66? no it was route 66

Took a sat nav back a few years ago because of this  even the British English voice setting did it. The shop assistant thought it was quite funny that I actually wanted to test a different brand in the shop  to see how it pronounced it.

Yet another Americanism that’s creeping in is the way numbers are said. I’ve heard on the news several times now, ‘one hundred fifty’ instead of one hundred AND fifty. I just think, why?

I love America and (most) Americans, by the way. I just wish that over here we would keep to our British brand of English. 
 

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2 hours ago, Roving Mick said:

On TV and radio interviews, people who have to start every sentence with the word 'So'.  It used to be 'Basically', but 'So' seems to be the in-word at the moment.

Quite agree Mick. They’re the same sort of people who have started making their voices rise at the end of their sentence (like Australians have always done). They come out with what should be a statement but, with the atonement in their voices, it now sounds like a question and that they are unsure of what they are saying.

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Americanisms do my head in, the Missus is terrible for it.

‘Take out’ instead of ‘takeaway’.

’Can I get’ instead of ‘can I have’

‘Shots’ instead of ‘jabs’

’the oven/toaster/boiler is shot’ instead of ‘broke’


There’s loads of others I’ve forgot and since lockdown they seem to be ever more prevalent, Netflix effect?

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People who think me checking they're over 18 at the doorstep/checkout is a personal slight.

It's actually so I don't get caught out and face £10,000 fine, the sack, and 6 months in prison.

If you don't have ID (a driving licence) on you having driven to the store, you are literally a moron. It may not be illegal, but it saves a LOT of hassle.

On that note, don't let your teenage child put alcohol on the checkout belt, I will assume you're buying for them and, without ID, neither of you are leaving with any alcohol.

Edited by Mike E
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Americanisms are a blight on the British English language and need to be resisted.

Lawmakers instead of politicians or legislators is one that has become widely used in the media.

Skedule instead of the correct schedule in the spoken word drives me nuts and the Oxford comma has crept into written language, and is very annoying (see what I did there?) 

And don’t anyone dare use  train station instead of railway station 

Edited by jim mk2
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2 hours ago, jim mk2 said:

Americanisms are a blight on the British English language and need to be resisted.

Lawmakers instead of politicians or legislators is one that has become widely used in the media.

Skedule instead of the correct schedule in the spoken word drives me nuts and the Oxford comma has crept into written language, and is very annoying (see what I did there?) 

And don’t anyone dare use  train station instead of railway station 

Or worse still, people who leave a double space between words tut,tut.

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2 hours ago, Mike E said:

People who think me checking they're over 18 at the doorstep/checkout is a personal slight.

It's actually so I don't get caught out and face £10,000 fine, the sack, and 6 months in prison.

If you don't have ID (a driving licence) on you having driven to the store, you are literally a moron. It may not be illegal, but it saves a LOT of hassle.

On that note, don't let your teenage child put alcohol on the checkout belt, I will assume you're buying for them and, without ID, neither of you are leaving with any alcohol.

It does always feel like it goes too far though sometimes, like ages ago I go in on my way home from work, full office gear, full beard and a few grey hairs if you look close enough. Do a 90 quid food shop in which there is a small red wine (enough for a lasagne) and I get asked for ID. It reminds me of that inbetweeners scene in the off licence. 

 

 

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2 minutes ago, RoverDom said:

It does always feel like it goes too far though sometimes, like ages ago I go in on my way home from work, full office gear, full beard and a few grey hairs if you look close enough. Do a 90 quid food shop in which there is a small red wine (enough for a lasagne) and I get asked for ID. It reminds me of that inbetweeners scene in the off licence. 

You might be a victim of 'looking about 25', which is the guideline age given.

Plus you might just look dodgy 😛

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22 minutes ago, RoverDom said:

It does always feel like it goes too far though sometimes, like ages ago I go in on my way home from work, full office gear, full beard and a few grey hairs if you look close enough. Do a 90 quid food shop in which there is a small red wine (enough for a lasagne) and I get asked for ID. It reminds me of that inbetweeners scene in the off licence. 

 

 

I get annoyed at being asked for ID. I don't know why but I do. Puritanical America has some weird quirks asking for ID id one of them. Some shops have a "we ID everyone" policy when buying booze. My dad was with me once and they asked him. He's in his 70's. He started laughing. 

The American payments system is also years behind. The self styled most advanced nation on earth is not at all. I regularly get stuck behind someone paying with a cheque at the supermarket. It takes twice as long. It drives me bananas. Chip and pin was rolled out a few years ago, but banks decided that Americans aren't clever enough to use the pin part. Tap and pay is available in a few places but not enough, as is Apple/Google pay on a phone. It should be everywhere.

Americanisms in Britain also annoy me. I live in America, you'd think that I'd appreciate it, but no. 

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3 hours ago, jim mk2 said:

Americanisms are a blight on the British English language and need to be resisted.

And don’t anyone dare use  train station instead of railway station 

On that theme, Jim, train tracks instead of railway lines.

Both my kids, 30yrs and 36yrs say, ‘can I get’ instead of may I have...

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What did they do before they "drilled down" ? Perhaps they used a simple English word, such as "sought", or "searched", or "examined"?

And how about the "roadmap" out of lockdown? How did we ever survive all those years without "roadmaps"? In the old days there'd be a simple English word like "route", or "way", or "plan"?

Then there's the "rollout" of vaccines, when surely "distribution" is a perfectly adequate British English word and finally, the worst of the lot, "ramping up", probably the most overused American word of the pandemic and the most annoying when "increase" or "expand" or "extend" is easily understood

 

 

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Corporate bullshit:

'So moving forward, how can we get the ball rolling so we can meet this month's KPIs Ay-Sap?'

Obviously, the last one is ASAP but spoken as a word. It makes me occasionally thankful I'm deaf.

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Love corporate BS I have a competition with my colleague at our monthly department wide meeting where we all have to give an update on our work to see how many we can get in - synergies, segeway, across the piste, square the circle, risk appetite, onboarding, manage expectations (i.e. the work won't be done on time / to the right quality), touch base, horizon scanning. 

 

Apart from these monthly meetings I've always avoided corporate BS through fear of sounding like someone off the apprentice. 

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22 hours ago, Mattyblue said:

Americanisms do my head in, the Missus is terrible for it.

‘Take out’ instead of ‘takeaway’.

’Can I get’ instead of ‘can I have’

‘Shots’ instead of ‘jabs’

’the oven/toaster/boiler is shot’ instead of ‘broke’


There’s loads of others I’ve forgot and since lockdown they seem to be ever more prevalent, Netflix effect?

Reading between the lines, but it sounds like party time at Matty's. His missus has bust the oven/toaster/boiler, so she's asked if they can have take away and shots ever night!

Edited by DanLad
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4 hours ago, RoverDom said:

Love corporate BS I have a competition with my colleague at our monthly department wide meeting where we all have to give an update on our work to see how many we can get in - synergies, segeway, across the piste, square the circle, risk appetite, onboarding, manage expectations (i.e. the work won't be done on time / to the right quality), touch base, horizon scanning. 

 

Apart from these monthly meetings I've always avoided corporate BS through fear of sounding like someone off the apprentice. 

Blue Sky thinking

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