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Second striker

The second striker.  

214 members have voted

  1. 1. The second striker.

    • Matt Jansen
      22
    • Tommy Briggs
      19
    • David Speedie
      10
    • Jack Southworth
      12
    • Fred Pickering
      3
    • Roy Vernon
      2
    • Simon Garner
      109
    • Andy McEvoy
      2
    • John Byrom
      0
    • Mike Newell
      2
    • Duncan McKenzie
      0
    • Chris Sutton
      26
    • Kevin Gallacher
      7


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Result of the first strikers position:

Alan Shearer........................[ 179 ]........[82.11%]

Simon Garner.......................[ 15 ]..........[6.88%]

Matt Jansen..........................[ 10 ]..........[4.59%]

Tommy Briggs.......................[ 5 ].............[2.29%]

David Speedie......................[ 3 ].............[1.38%]

Chris Sutton.........................[ 3 ].............[1.38%]

Fred Pickering.......................[ 2 ]............[0.92%]

Roy Vernon...........................[ 1 ].............[0.46%]

Andy McEvoy.........................[ 0 ].............[0.00%]

John Byrom...........................[ 0 ]..............[0.00%]

Mike Newell...........................[ 0 ].............[0.00%]

Duncan McKenzie...................[ 0 ]..............[0.00%]

Andy Crawford......................[ 0 ]..............[0.00%] [replaced by jack Southworth for second vote].

Total Votes: 218

For anyone not familiar with this poll, the team, so far is:

Brad Friedel

Bob Crompton

Colin Hendry

Mike England

Graeme Le Saux

Bryan Douglas

Ronnie Clayton

Jimmy Forrest

Damien Duff

Alan Shearer

That leaves just one position to fill - the second strikers spot. He's got to be selected from the players listed above, minus Shearer. However, I've taken the liberty of adding Jack Southworth, because of the excellent testimonials submitted for him.

There shouldn't be a problem with leaving Andy Crawford out? smile.gif

I'll post some of the testimonials that you have already submitted after this post.

We'll have a day or two for anyone to come in with more testimonials or opinions, before we vote.

Edited by den

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David Speedie, from Colin:

You want a tale of goal-scoring?

You want a tale of full-on blue and white?

Ladies and Gentlemen, I give you the story of David Speedie.

It's a short story and lasts for just one season, not much to qualify as a "great"

David Speedie joined us from Liverpool in August 1991. He was signed by Don McKay who was soon to lose his managerial post to Kenny Dalglish as the Uncle Jack era took over.

He had previously played at (in no particular order) Barnsley, Doncaster, Darlington, Chelsea, Coventry City, Liverpool, Leicester City, West Bromwich Albion, West Ham United, Birmingham City, Accrington Stanley,

Greendale Argyle, Weatherfield United, & Trumpton Psychopaths and had made a name for himself as a bad -tempered & petulant little sod.

Like this:

http://www.premierleague.com/fapl.rac?comm...playerID=699103

Then he arrived at Ewood where he became our bad -tempered & petulant little sod. He played for us for just one season. 43 games in all, 26 goals. Then he moved to Southampton in part-exchange for some bloke called Shearer.

Re-wind...........26 goals in 43 games? Indeed, that is very close to two goals for every three games.

As well as his aggression he has a great sense of positioning and movement, he seemed to be able to sense where the ball would be in a second's time and be there to meet it. For a relatively small player he won a remarkable number of headers.

I was thinking of commenting on one or two examples of games where Speedie's contribution turned the game on its head. The last day of the season hat-trick against Plymouth to get us into the play-offs. His brace in the play-off semis against Derby, and his *ahem* winning the penalty in the final itself. However these fade into insignificance against one game where he gave one of the greatest performances I have witnessed by a Rovers' striker.

15th February 1992, at home against the then struggling Newcastle who had just taken on Kevin Keegan as manager. Naturally the Geordies came down in their masses and filled the Darwen End. We filled the rest of Ewood. Newcastle took an early lead before Speedie smashed home his first, just before half time, in front of the Blackburn End. His second was the most spectacular flying header I have ever witnessed and to rub salt in the Geordie wounds he went and celebrated in front of them. The third was an equally spectacular volley and again he went over to the visitors and punched the air. These days he'd probably be on a three match suspension for that, but on the day he created one of the best atmospheres I've witnessed at Ewood.

So, there you are, my shout for Speedie. Not that it'll do much good because we all know which pair have got this one sew up like a kipper.

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Andy McEvoy from Ian Rally:

Born in Dublin and bought from Bray Wanderers in 1956 he made his League debut in 1958-59 as a wing-half as back up to Clayton and McGrath. The then manager Jack Marshall converted him to inside forward alongside Fred Pickering in 1962-63 season. This resulted in a strong goal scoring partnership the envy of many and the following season saw Andy become the League's leading scorer with 32 goals from 37 appearances. Including cup games his total for the season was 36 goals from 41 appearances.

A very healthy return you must agree, especially as the top marksmen of the time were Jimmy Greaves and Denis Law both of who were beaten by Andy's total.

He was the epitome of a good striker, lurking in or around the area with blistering pace and deadly finishing.

The McEvoy-Pickering combination was ended prematurely when Pickering was sold to Everton in 1964 and Jon Byrom was to be McEvoy's new strike partner, and that season his tally was down to 32 goals from 45 appearances.

Relegation in 1966 seemed to affect him and he became disillusioned with the professional game and returned to Ireland to play for Limerick and finished driving a tram in the city. He continued to play for Limerick until the early 70's and sadly Andy died a couple of years ago.

As a 16 year old at the time of his goal scoring exploits I have always felt privileged to have seen him play and remember him with great affection as one of Rovers truly great strikers.

Total League Appearances 183 Goals 89

Total Cup Appearances 30 Goals 14

Total 213 Total 103

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Kevin Gallacher from Tango:

Blackburn have had their fair share of Scottish legends: Colin Hendry, Kenny Dalglish... even Graeme Souness!

Then there was Kevin Gallacher. A neat and tidy, nippy winger-come-striker, Gallacher was a truely enjoyable player to watch; gave defences the run around on many occasion that I watched him. A hat-trick back in the 96/97 season against Wimbledon was a highlight, particularly when he nicked the ball away from Neil Sullivan, who'd spilled his shot, and poked it into the net.

His partnership with Sutton was perhaps not the most prolific, but at least when the two of them were up front you knew there'd be chances and some level of excitement. In fact Gallacher's talent was perhaps more in laying on chances for others than it was taking them. He remains affectionately remembered wherever he played in football, from Dundee to Coventry, Blackburn to Newcastle. Gallacher was a great little player and, for me, rated above Sutton (although I may well be alone in that!)

Gallacher was also a very mild-mannered man, from what I remember of his time at Rovers, never got involved in the sort of dodgy escapades that now litter the world of football and are smeared across tabloid front-pages nationwide.

I've given my first vote to Shearer, but Gallacher is definitely worthy of the second striker's berth. Then we'd be cooking with GAS. tinykit.gif

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Tommy Briggs from Billy:

To start with I've been fortunate enough to have watched every centre forward, from Dennis Westcott to the present day. I dont have to say who was the best, we all know that, our Alan, commentators drooled over him, papers filled their back pages with he's photo's, reporters never had it so good, but all of them had one theme, they said "he plays like an old fashioned centre forward", how true that is, but which old fashioned centre forward? only one that played for us, thats Tommy Briggs without a shadow of a doubt , all you supporters who were sat on the rug, in front of the fire, tapping the dog on its head with a spoon, have no idea what 'old fashioned centre forward means' but us old giffers do, it means running through mud on rough pitches, jumping for the corners trying to knock the goalie (with he's knees up) and ball in the net, while the defenders tried to 'drop' you, as you was charged from one side to the other and back again, Tommy was the best, for us he scored over 30 goals a season four seasons on the run, in that time he missed only three games, before he was a Rover he was also the leagues top scorer, beating second placed Tommy Lawton by seven goals. I think everone will know about he's seven goals in one game, he scored one in the first half at the Blackburn end, then six in the Darwen end, also hitting the post, and had quite a few saved, for he's third goal he jumped a bit early, but he just waited in the air then nodded it home in the top left corner , I think David Blaine must have heard of that , he makes a living out of it and calls it levitation. No other team could boast a combination of two strikers with consistant goal scoring form, which is what the position is all about, than Shearer and Briggs, remember its goals that count, Shearer over thirty three seasons running, Briggs over thirty four seasons running, no excuses, we want consistant goal scorers, vote them both, the two top goal scorers from different eras, they were one and the same believe me.

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Simon Garner from Cheshire Blue:

Every League club has a folk hero; a player who becomes at first a favourite with the fans and then something more: a legend, a totem, a symbol of everything supporters believe their club stands for. There is Tosh Chamberlain at Fulham, Rodney Marsh at Queen's Park Rangers, Peter Osgood at Chelsea, and at Blackburn Rovers, there is Simon Garner.

Even today, 10 years after he last played for the club, the chant: "There's Only One Simon Garner" still regularly echoes round Ewood Park. Quite how a man who never even got a kick in the Premiership could have become the club's spiritual mascot might seem a bit of a mystery, but all is explained if you pick up his autobiography. For in telling his story - Blackburn's all-time top scorer, a succession of ever-lesser clubs, and a divorce so messy he was sent to prison (where the man-of-the-match award was an ounce of tobacco), right down to his present contentment in Berkshire -- he inadvertently reveals why he had such rapport with the crowd.

To the fans, Garner was always one of our own. Even after he'd knocked in a Saturday goal or two and had pride of place on the back of the Lancashire Evening Telegraph, he always had time for a laugh, a fag and a drink with them. Or with anyone, for that matter. Newly signed team-mates were liable to be judged on their ability to smoke or drink,a nd Simon was the man to judge them.

He earned good money (£600 a week at its peak), but not silly money. He lived in the town, not on Nob Hill. He drove a decent car, not something out of a Bond film. He never pretended. No airs and graces off the pitch, and no dives in the box on it. And if Rovers were a goal or two to the bad, and time was ticking on and you had no more fingernails to bite, there was always a chance that Gamer would turn it around by popping a couple in.

But, above all, in the pre-Jack Walker days, the club's fans knew that if there was a Blackburn occasion, good or ill, then there would be Garner, chest puffed out, doing his level best. He was there with Jim Smith (who concluded a rollocking on smoking by offering him a cigar), there when Jim Iley arrived ("very dour… he made Howard Wilkinson look like Ken Dodd"), he played and drank with Howard Kendall, and was with Bobby Saxton's side when, in a vital game against Wolves, their manager, Tommy Docherty, sat in on the Blackburn team-talk and then calmly stood up saying "Don't worry about our lot; they're crap".

He was there for the descent into the Third Division, the climb out of it, and those agonising seasons when, three years in a row, Blackburn reached the play-offs, only to lose.

Even Garners high times had a Blackburnish quality: a win at Wembley in 1987, but it was only the Full-Members' Cup final; and as Garner broke the club's scoring record in 1989 the celebrations had hardly started before news came through of an unfolding disaster across the Pennines at Hillsborough.

Three years later, Garner was still here as King Kenny and Uncle Jack arrived to transform the club. And when Blackburn reached the play-off finals at Wembley, Dalglish made sure the old forward was given one of the three non-playing places on the bench. So there he was, smoking agitatedly through an entire pack as his club reached the Premiership, just like any fan. And when, at Blackburn Town Hall, the team were feted on their return, there, of course, was Gamer again, grinning and happy and slightly inebriated. And what did the crowd sing? "There's Only One Simon Garner..."

Garner may not have scored a hatful of premiership goals, won a plethora of international caps, but what he did do was serve our club faithfully for 14 years of his life. He went up and down three divisions with us, and scored a hut full of goals in each of those divisions. His goals got us into the play-offs three years running, and if we'd seized an earlier chance, who knows - he may have scored a hat full in the Premiership.

Probably not the most gifted player ever, or the hardest worker, but second only to Shearer in terms of his greatness in the history of Blackburn Rovers.

Vote Garner. Not that you weren't going to already, of course....

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Bazza recommended Jack Southworth and Ian Rally followed up with this:

Well there have been some very meritous posts on some of our well known strikers and as bazza says, no mention of Jack Southworth who I am afraid non of us have seen play. Nevertheless the stats deem that he does indeed deserve recocnition among our hero's.

I take the following from Mike Jackman's 'Blackburn Rovers. A Complete Record'

Jack Southworth was born in Blackburn in 1876 and was Rovers first truly prolific goalscorer. he began his football career at the age of 12 when he formed a junior club named Inkerman Rangers. He later played for Brookhouse Perseverance, which were both nurseries for Blackburn Olympic. Southworth was promoted to the Olympic second team in 1883-84. His ability was quickley recognized by the committee at Olympic and he was made captain of the second team and first reserve when there was a vacancy in the first team. It was at this time that he rejected the first approach by Rovers to join them. Whilst guesting in a match for accrington he received a serious knee injury which threatened his career. Having lost some of his mobility he turned his hand to goalkeeping and became the first team goalkeeper with Olympic. having helped Olympic to win the Lancashire Cup against Rovers in 1885, he now received a serious injury to his other knee whilst guesting for Vale of Lune. The following year he signed professional terms with Blackburn Olympic despite his knee problems. A keen musician, he took a job with a theatre in Chester and returned to Olympic, resuming his old position of centre forward. having overcome his injuries, he became a great success as a centre forward and in the 1887-88 season saw him finally join the Rovers.

A contemporary wrote that: 'His dodging, his neat passing, his speed and general accuracy in shooting won the hearts of the spectators at the Leamington ground. He is built for speed, he plays an unselfish game, he's good at tackling and has excellent jugement.'

He captained the side as it made it's first excursion into league football and became a prolific goalscorer. Capped three times for England, he won FA Cup winners medals in 1890 and 1891. In August 1893 Everton paid £400 for his services and in his first season he scored 27 goals in 22 games. The following season saw him score 9 goals in 9 games, before injury and illness finally forced him into retirement. Turning to his other love, he became a professional violinist and played with the Halle Orchestra.

Rovers career statistics:

League Played 108 Goals 97

Cup Played 25 Goals 25

Total Played 133 Goals 122

During this time the scorers of 11 league goals and 3 Cup goals remain unidentified so Jacks total goals could be more than shown..

I thank bazza for bringing this great goalscorer to our attention and I hope that the above is of interest to you all as it has been to me. A truly remarkable player I think you will agree

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First time I've done this, but another testimonial for Southworth. It's too good to leave out:

Turning to his other love, he became a professional violinist and played with the Halle Orchestra.

Sorry, I'm just stumped with that. Just thought I needed to bring it up. Amazing.

Amazing it is to be sure ; I simply can't imagine present day kids being allowed to handle a violin let alone being taught to play it .... unsure.gif

Here's a bit more about Southworth (who later played for Everton) taken from aa Everton website . Can you imagine this bloke up front with Shearer ?

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

The Victorian Gary Lineker!

JACK SOUTHWORTH was an early Everton sharp-shooter christened the "Prince of Dribblers."

A more modern description, however, might have been the Victorian Gary Lineker.

Like the England sharp-shooter of the 1980s (left), he served Everton for just one full season, finished that campaign as the top division's top scorer, but still left the club empty handed.

But while Lineker left Goodison voluntarily, Southworth's departure in October 1894 was forced on him by injury.

It was an awful blow for the Blues, who had invested the considerable sum of £400 on Southworth's signature 18 months previously.

But with a haul of 27 league goals in 22 appearances in his first full season Everton recouped immediate dividends for their outlay.

That haul was boosted by an astonishing scoring spree either side of Christmas - a blitz which created a club record which stands to this day. On December 30, 1893, Southworth became the first - and so far the only Evertonian to celebrate a double hat-trick . . . a week after he had scored four goals in an 8-1 defeat of Sheffield Wednesday.

The double hat-trick came in a 7-1 defeat of West Bromwich Albion at Goodison Park. "Southworth scores 6 out of

7 goals" was the Football Echo headline that day, although Evertonians were fortunate to witness the momentous feat.

With three other First Division games abandoned through fog, Everton's was completed despite a gloomy mist shrouding Goodison Park.

The gate at kick-off of 12,000 was described as "enormous" by that day's Echo. When the second half commenced the attendance had increased to "some 18,000" and before the finish had swollen to "about 25,000."

Maybe the extra numbers had been attracted by rumours of Southworth's goal-getting feats.

"Southworth gave one of his wonderfully good displays," reported the Football Echo.

"There is not the slightest doubt but that the whole of the Everton successes just now are traceable to the skilful manipulation of the ball by Southworth, who displays a masterly control of it. The rest of the team apparently recognises Southworth's grand form and unselfishly afford him every opportunity for displaying it."

Sadly for Everton that form lasted only a further 10 months.

After finishing the League's top scorer at the end of the 1893-94 season, he kicked off the following campaign like he intended to repeat the feat. He scored nine goals in nine games, before an injury ended his career.

It brought to a close a career which ended with the incredible record of 139 appearances for Blackburn Olympic, Blackburn Rovers and Everton - scoring 139 goals. He was also capped three times by England, and predictably registered three goals.

After his enforced retirement Southworth proved his talents didn't just extend to his shooting boots.

A gifted musician, he played with the Halle Orchestra in Manchester.

The musical accompaniment to his prematurely ended career might well have been titled Unfinished Symphony. At least he enjoyed the honour of becoming the first Evertonian to finish as the Football League's leading scorer

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Simon Garner........it says something very special about a player who,10 years after having left the club, attracts a 15,000 crowd to his testimonial game

Does it say something special? unsure.gif I don't think so. 50,000 yeah, 15 ain't much to brag about.

Tommy Briggs for me.

Simon Garner should be nowhere near the top, but he'll probably win. 10 people voted for Matt Jansen first time out FFS!

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Im in a delema about this one, should it be the best striker in his own right or should it be the best striker that would be compatable with Shearers style of play.

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Im in a delema about this one, should it be the best striker in his own right or should it be the best striker that would be compatable with Shearers style of play.

We're not taking tactics into consideration Al.

Simply 11 players who deserve to be remembered as "great"

Even though there's one who isn't biggrin.gif

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And importance to the Club e.g. Southworth,Garner,Briggs,Ted Harper and the great Tony Field.

I shall probably vote for Sutton ...when have Rovers players ever been known by their initials worldwide? S.A.S.

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Jansen a great ??

Greater than Garner, Briggs, Southworth, Speedie, Gallacher, Sutton ??? Bloody hell 10 people think he's greater than Shearer.. what planet are you on ?

Its the same as those who vote for the likes of Robbie Williams in the greatest ever musician polls. He's still a current player and therefore popular, but probably on a par with Wegerle in the bigger picture.

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Every member of the greatest team selected so far plied their trade for Rovers in the top league across the near 130 years of the club's illustrious history. Most won at least one major honour whilst with Rovers (or a runners-up medal in the case of Douglas and Clayton) and for many, Rovers was the only club with whom they won anything (and that for the next three weeks still goes for Damien Duff rover.gif ).

More poignantly, everyone of them were not only internationals but multiple cap winners and several captained their respective country.

So why should we break this record and elect a player who never won a cap, never collected more than a Full Members Cup winners medal and never once played at the highest level?

I'll tell you why- Simon Garner is quite simply a legend and a player whose feat in being the club's leading goal scorer with a relatively modest sub-200 total of goals will nevertheless be unlikely to be beaten for many years, if ever.

Not only was he a goal scorer but Garns was ever a grafter and always popular with the crowd from the day as a teenager he buried a chance in the Anglo-Scottish Cup to mark his first goal for the Rovers to the day he walked out as a non-playing member of the play off promotion winning side.

Garner was well capable of amazing single handed scoring feats- I'll never forget shaking hands with him on the pitch before a game against Derby and shaking hands again two hours later in the 100 Club after he had scored all five in a one man 5-1 demolition "derby". There was a 4 against Sunderland and quite a few hattricks including the three great strikes against Pompey away in a recovery from two down to win 4-2. (Poor Neil Webb- he scored three times to take the lead for Pompey against Rovers that season and Rovers took all six points!)

Of course the hattrick against Man City when the Darwen End was covered in discarded inflatable bananas brought by the fans of all-conquering City could have been the most joyous day of all as we thrashed them 4-0 and the new goal scoring record was set but it was for ever over-shadowed by the events at Hillsborough.

It wasn't just the routine second or third division games in which Garner scored but he made a speciality of scoring against top flight opposition whenever we drew them in the Cup. Twice in different seasons he put the Rovers into the lead against Liverpool at Ewood- one a truly stupendous swivel and strike from a corner. Away at QPR, he streaked away from the defence in a way that became a Shearer trade mark to beat Phil Parkes with a curling daisy cutter on his near post to give us yet another lead we failed to protect.

For me the greatest Garner performance came in a League Cup game at Ipswich when Rovers were so badly hit by injuries a postponement was requested but denied. With only eight fully fit players Rovers took on the UEFA Cup holders with Thyssen, Mariner and Wark (who was to score a hattrick) in the side. More to the point, Garner was facing the two England central defenders- Terry Butcher and Russel Osman with one of the best keepers around, Cooper, in goal behind them.

Nothing daunted, Garns twice received the ball with his back to goal, comprehensively turned and went past both Butcher and Osman, beat the Ipswich defence and thrashed the ball past Cooper from about 15 yards out. Even in the second half after Ipswich had pulled the two goal deficit back to 2-2, Garner was not done and he again beat Osman all-ends up to get into position to strike a blistering shot which Cooper parried onto the post. The ball returned kindly to Garner who rather than going for glory as a recovered Osman blocked his sight on goal, precisely and deliberately passed the ball ten yards sideways across the box to an unmarked Windy Miller who just as precisely passed the ball just inside the post with Cooper unable to recover the ground. 2-3 became 4-3 to the home side but that remains one of my favourite Rovers memories.

Absolutely magnificent stuff- and I am sure there were other goals against top flight opposition in the Full Members, League and FA Cups I haven't remembered.

Although Garner gathered his greatest haul of goals against Derby County (12 in all down the years) it was against Burnley that he was unnerringly the master executioner. From a stunning 25 yard blast with which he put Rovers into the lead the last time the dingles won at Ewood to the tap in which completed the double at t'Turf, Garner just loved scoring against the dingles. For many years, the dingles were in the outer darknesses of football but Garns crossed their paths again in his later days- scoring with glee for West Brom and Wycombe against them to rub in the old emnity.

There are great contenders for the second spot- goal machines Southworth and Briggs, mercurial McEvoy, the unsurpassed talents of McKenzie and in recent times Newell and Sutton who were technically the equal of any strikers but the heart, overwhelmingly, and the head, with justification, says a list of Rovers greats would look as odd without Garner as it would with England, Clayton or Douglas missing.

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Jansen a great ??

Greater than Garner, Briggs, Southworth, Speedie, Gallacher, Sutton ??? Bloody hell 10 people think he's greater than Shearer.. what planet are you on ?

Its the same as those who vote for the likes of Robbie Williams in the greatest ever musician polls. He's still a current player and therefore popular, but probably on a par with Wegerle in the bigger picture.

To be honest you never know with these things, I always vote on the basis that the best I have ever seen play for Rovers.

So my next vote will either be for Sutton or Jansen, in this case Jansen. Shearer got my vote because I had the pleasure of seeing him in a Rovers shirt, if I had become a Rovers supporter within the last 5 years though, then I would have voted for Jansen first up. So you never know with these things.

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Jansen a great ??

Greater than Garner, Briggs, Southworth, Speedie, Gallacher, Sutton ???  Bloody hell 10 people think he's greater than Shearer.. what planet are you on ?

Its the same as those who vote for the likes of Robbie Williams in the greatest ever musician polls.  He's still a current player and therefore popular, but probably on a par with Wegerle in the bigger picture.

To be honest you never know with these things, I always vote on the basis that the best I have ever seen play for Rovers.

So my next vote will either be for Sutton or Jansen, in this case Jansen. Shearer got my vote because I had the pleasure of seeing him in a Rovers shirt, if I had become a Rovers supporter within the last 5 years though, then I would have voted for Jansen first up. So you never know with these things.

Then I guess we should rename the squad to best 10 in Eddie's lifetime, instead of best 10 EVER.

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I'm leaning towards Briggs at the moment for his goal scoring record in such a short space of time, scoring seven in one game is pretty unique!

However Garner's rapport with the fans and his long service bring him into consideration.

Why did Briggs move and was he idolised by the fans at Blackburn? Did he just move onto a bigger club?

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Jansen a great ??

Greater than Garner, Briggs, Southworth, Speedie, Gallacher, Sutton ???  Bloody hell 10 people think he's greater than Shearer.. what planet are you on ?

Its the same as those who vote for the likes of Robbie Williams in the greatest ever musician polls.  He's still a current player and therefore popular, but probably on a par with Wegerle in the bigger picture.

To be honest you never know with these things, I always vote on the basis that the best I have ever seen play for Rovers.

So my next vote will either be for Sutton or Jansen, in this case Jansen. Shearer got my vote because I had the pleasure of seeing him in a Rovers shirt, if I had become a Rovers supporter within the last 5 years though, then I would have voted for Jansen first up. So you never know with these things.

Then I guess we should rename the squad to best 10 in Eddie's lifetime, instead of best 10 EVER.

Thank you for that.

I wasn't saying everyone should judge players based on my lifetime. All I'm saying is how on earth could I know if some player in the 50's or 60's was better than a player of more recent times. I've never even seen video footage of many of these let alone seen them at first hand. I judge as best I can, and really the only way I can do that is to judge the players I really know. I don't begrudge the fact that some of the older members have seen Rovers for decades and so can pass comment on hundreds of players who have put on the shirt, I'm limited to my own experiences since I was 6 years old, and in my case that only goes back 11 years.

I'm sorry I'm young.

Edited by Eddie

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In that case how can you know Churchill was a great PM? How can you know Hitler was worse than Saddam?

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