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Glenn

Running and general keep fit

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How time change. Once upon a time this forum seems to be all about beer and pies, but now I notice growing numbers of us attempting to keep fit in various ways.

So, what are you doing to keep fit, what are you goals, which events / races are you doing ?

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First off I'm not on any huge health kick. Now I've retired this is much simpler to work on. On January 1st I weighed in at 175lbs (79.4kg). This morning I weighed in at 167.4lbs (75.9kg). I belong to a small informal weight loss group and my target for the year is 165lbs though I've now revised this to 160lbs. I should mention I weighed in at exactly 88kg on January 1st 2015.

My targets for the year are:

Complete the Eureka ride - this is a local 120 mile ride on May 28th

Complete Ride Scotland - another local ride involving a 223 mile round trip to Gretna in a day. This is on June 17th. At 62 this is the greatest physical challenge of my life.

Complete Ride London - a 100 mile closed road event on the Olympic road race route. I have a specific time in mind which I've only shared with one person!!!

My approach to this is in some cases fairly obvious not so with everything:

Drink 3 litres of water per day. I was badly dehydrated. 

Continue to reduce alcohol intake. Reduce caffeine to two cups a day. Reduce rubbish foods further. Simply drinking water helps significantly on these targets. 

Work with my good friend and training buddy on diet and our mutual cycling targets. I've learned what I thought is a healthy diet truly is healthy but the balance of nutrients is wrong for me. Fixing this is tough.

Understand what makes me binge  - basically this is not eating enough to satisfy my body's needs. Eat more of the right stuff and lose weight. When I binge my body is simply screaming for energy in the fastest possible way. This seriously involves eating more.

Walk 4 miles a day. This is difficult as I'm so busy being retired!

Increase the intensity of my cycling - 2 hours of very hard work is more beneficial than a 5-6 hour ride.

Begin Pilates - tonight as it happens

 

Edited by Paul
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Glenn - I notice you didn't bare your soul!! :)  :) 

Edited by Paul

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Just now, Steve1 said:

Sounds good...well done..water is 10000% essential to keep hydrated..so many people don't realise how important it is 

Absolutely. I started the water thing in February before I retired. Dropped from multiple coffees per day to two. Caffeine is a diuretic. Alcohol dropped naturally. For years if I had one glass of wine I'd want another. What I failed to understand is I was using coffee and alcohol to hydrate my body. Disaster. 

Support is essential. The need to be accountable to others. Our weight loss group is just 11 guys who support each other. Lieing to them or Hayley, my training friend, is impossible. 

Edited by Paul
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I split up from my girlfriend last August, then train wrecked for a bit before deciding to go on a big health kick in late December.

Since then, I've been going to a personal trainer twice a week and eating a lot  better, not drinking nearly as much and upping my water intake.

I've dropped 2 and a half stone and feel a lot better, I think that with the cost of a PT, I'll be joining a gym soon as it's a lot cheaper, especially now I have the motivation to keep the weight off.

The only downside is having to buy new clothes, ha. This especially bites when you've got expensive tastes like I have!

The best things I can recommend would be drinking more water (I drink 3 litres a day and more, the only downside is how much I go to the toilet!!).

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Last year I got back into running in a big way, going from couch to half marathon.

Sadly this year, with the chaos of changing jobs, 3hrs of communiting a day and a seemingly endless run of illness and injury, my running has been limited to park runs, a couple of 10ks (including the winter warmer around Wittin Park, with the stupidly long hill) and very little actual training.

However, I did manage to get down to my local running club last night and got 5 miles in and I'm expecting to do the 3 bridges 10k race in Lancaster in a couple of weeks, but I'm not committing to anything more than 10ks until I get my general fitness back up.

My aim is to break 50 mins for a 10k this year (I came close at the Abbey Dash last year) but I'm away off that at the moment. I'm also doing most of my racing in Lancashire (so I can tie it in with trips to see the family) so I keep expecting to bump into the likes of @Manchester Blue and @ScottSlater , but I haven't do so far.

I also lost a LOT of weight last year when I sorted by diet out. I've lapsed a lot this year, but I'm amaing to go back into it seriously soon. 

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At the moment I am doing a 10k run, in 45 mins or under every weekend. I've been doing this for months. Not sure exactly when it started, maybe 6-8 months ago.

I did build up my running to 11miles at one point but I started to feel some pain in my left knee during a 10miler that I had planned so I dropped the running down to 10k. Its been fine for months but I went for my usual run over the weekend and had pain in my knee when walking up the stairs.

With this in mind i'm considering looking at some alternatives to running, although its a shame as I do enjoy going for a run.

Cycling (as I cycle to work) and or swimming seem to be my first thoughts, my concern is time. If I go for a run, I am only out for 45 mins, I suspect i'll need to double that for an equivalent cycle ride. Not easy when I have 2 kids, one which is only 9 weeks old.

I play footy twice a week (6 aside) as well, which is a great fitness boost.

A few years ago I made the decision to eat and drink better, one main thing I cut out was fizzy drinks, which I think contributed massively to losing 1 and half stone at the time.

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The only sport I've ever had the motivation to stick to is football.

When I was 19 and 27, I tore my ACL in each knee and had them repaired. After both operations, I went through a hiatus of not playing football due to the weaker ligaments, and tried both running and biking. Unfortunately, I just didn't enjoy those exercises much, and it became a chore, rather than an enjoyment or fulfilment. I went back to playing football on both occasions, but it just hurts my knees too much. I tried again twice in the last month but, again, it's really hurting and taking me two weeks to recover from knee pain. I'm gutted about it, because I love playing, but simply can't.

I think I've concluded that, while I'm not overweight or unhealthy as such, I am too lazy and unmotivated to stick to any other exercise regime (just the sound of that is terrible) or sport. I'm thinking about doing long walks as an alternative, as there's lots of mountain paths and so on nearby.

Now, back to Monkey Island.

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3 hours ago, davulsukur said:

With this in mind i'm considering looking at some alternatives to running, although its a shame as I do enjoy going for a run.

Cycling (as I cycle to work) and or swimming seem to be my first thoughts, my concern is time. If I go for a run, I am only out for 45 mins, I suspect i'll need to double that for an equivalent cycle ride.

As well as playing football, my main sport years ago, was fell running. I also did some road running and ran a half marathon in around one and a half hours in addition to several 10ks. 

I then snapped my right ankle and dislocated it at the same time playing football. I was back running within five months but I rushed things and before I was 30 I had to give the running up. I bought a half decent racing bike, never joined a club, just did my own thing, cycling anything up to say 70 miles, mainly on Sunday mornings. A good ride was from Darwen to the high point of the Trough of Bowland via Longridge Fell. You can obviously taylor each ride depending on your condition or how you feel but it's fair to say that you need to be out for at least two hours to benefit fitness wise. I also had a young family at that time so, after several years of cycling, I moved on to swimming where a solid one hour of lane swimming was as good as going out for two or three hours on the bike. The downside to swimming was that I found it incredibly boring although it's a great sport if you want to bulk up a bit, mainly upper body.

I'm now a bloody wreck and with a sciatic nerve problem, limit myself to walking/dog walking as a means to keeping fit, coupled with a sensible and mainly fat free diet! For the first time in my life, I touched 14 stones on the scales at the end of last year but have now reduced that back to my 'normal' weight of bang on 13 stones.

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Anyone had any issues with IT band syndrome? 

I play football and squash a few times a week so my fitness isn't too bad, but whenever I attempt road-running my right knee is crippled within a few miles. I did get it checked out at a physio and they mentioned something about hip stability, but whatever exercises I do seem to have no effect. 

Really annoying as I do want to get into running properly.

Edited by LeChuck

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54 minutes ago, Claytons Left Boot said:

As well as playing football, my main sport years ago, was fell running. I also did some road running and ran a half marathon in around one and a half hours in addition to several 10ks. 

I then snapped my right ankle and dislocated it at the same time playing football. I was back running within five months but I rushed things and before I was 30 I had to give the running up. I bought a half decent racing bike, never joined a club, just did my own thing, cycling anything up to say 70 miles, mainly on Sunday mornings. A good ride was from Darwen to the high point of the Trough of Bowland via Longridge Fell. You can obviously taylor each ride depending on your condition or how you feel but it's fair to say that you need to be out for at least two hours to benefit fitness wise. I also had a young family at that time so, after several years of cycling, I moved on to swimming where a solid one hour of lane swimming was as good as going out for two or three hours on the bike. The downside to swimming was that I found it incredibly boring although it's a great sport if you want to bulk up a bit, mainly upper body.

I'm now a bloody wreck and with a sciatic nerve problem, limit myself to walking/dog walking as a means to keeping fit, coupled with a sensible and mainly fat free diet! For the first time in my life, I touched 14 stones on the scales at the end of last year but have now reduced that back to my 'normal' weight of bang on 13 stones.

So what you're saying is, if I want to be a complete write off in a few years, continue with my plan? (which is very similar to what you did)

:P

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4 hours ago, Phil T said:

The only sport I've ever had the motivation to stick to is football.

When I was 19 and 27, I tore my ACL in each knee and had them repaired. After both operations, I went through a hiatus of not playing football due to the weaker ligaments, and tried both running and biking. Unfortunately, I just didn't enjoy those exercises much, and it became a chore, rather than an enjoyment or fulfilment. I went back to playing football on both occasions, but it just hurts my knees too much. I tried again twice in the last month but, again, it's really hurting and taking me two weeks to recover from knee pain. I'm gutted about it, because I love playing, but simply can't.

 

I'm somewhat the same. All I ever played was football. I too succumbed to injuries. I broke my leg badly in my mid 20's and it put pay to playing at the level I was. I was out for a year but I managed to get back to full fitness through lots of rehab, and haven't suffered any since. I managed to play on for another 10 years, not at the same level but it was a decent run out with a lot of lads who really got along. I stopped due to having young children, and realizing that I had to shout and scream to get motivated. 20 year old's who couldn't trap a bag of cement didn't want me telling them that game after game. I made the decision to quit as it wasn't fair on them or I.

I miss the lads I play with, but we still meet up once or twice a year for a few drinks and a laugh.

Since then I have put on a few pounds, nothing major but I'm not fighting weight any more. I watch what I eat. I don't really eat sweets. Rarely drink soft drinks - hard to do in America, and try to limit carbs - not easy either.

My primary form of exercise is walking the dog. I'm very regimented in taking him for a good hour or so every day. The poor thing has worn out paws due to it all.

One thing I can't do is run because of my leg. It still has a rod in it and due to the callus from the bone heal I get a throbbing pain in my leg if I run too far on hard surfaces. I'd love to play golf but children take up my spare time.

I foresee an uptick soon though. 2 mountain bike trial parks have just opened close to me. When I 've recovered from the financial hit of Disney I'm going to buy a new bike and get going as I have always enjoyed biking.

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In my post-football days, I really miss my running. Came back from a short jog 2 years ago and felt a sharp pain in the knee. Cartilege had split and the surgeon advised to stop running - even on more forgiving surfaces such as grass. Since then have taken up cycling (but with little enthusiasm) and intermittent visits to gym fitness classes where I hide at the back out of view of the old ladies:o.   Nothing beats running for sheer torture and the feelgood factor and I've not felt really fit since I stopped.

In the summer, I still wield the willow but no one ever got fit playing cricket - in fact, with the volume of beer consumed the opposite is the case. 

Edited by jim mk2

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I keep trying to get back into running but never last more than a week.

After my efforts with the Edinburgh Marathon last year, my enthusiasm was replaced by drudgery and boredom.

As for a weight loss tip, listen to the Big Yin: 'Never eat anything that comes in a bucket'.

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1 hour ago, LeChuck said:

Anyone had any issues with IT band syndrome? 

I play football and squash a few times a week so my fitness isn't too bad, but whenever I attempt road-running my right knee is crippled within a few miles. I did get it checked out at a physio and they mentioned something about hip stability, but whatever exercises I do seem to have no effect. 

Really annoying as I do want to get into running properly.

Yep, certainly have. Also, shin splints, halux vagus, achilles tendonitis, sciatica and plantar fascitis. All through running.

I once got ITBS halfway through a marathon, had to walk to the end. A bad experience.

Try to avoid running on cambers. Find a type of shoe that fits you and is suitable for your gait, and replace it every year/500 miles. Get a book on joint mobility (Kelly Starrett's supple leopard is highly recommended, also, Steve Maxwell does some cool videos) and/or yoga and practise diligently. Watch your posture and also your chair set-up and don't get stuck in one position too long. The pigeon pose from yoga would probably help loads.

I used to do a lot of running. Problem is, whatever you eat - if you're a distance runner, it just melts in the furnbace of your metabolism. I then stopped running, but kept eating and got bigger. And bigger. I'm now over twenty kilos heavier. I'd love to go running regularly again, but my body wouldn't withstand it. I just do races instead. I also do weights, and am trying to get my waistline down.

Races I'd recommend doing ... hmmm... Ron Hill Accy 10k (already been done this year, sadly), Amsterdam Half, Paris-Versailles, Marseilles-Cassis, NYC (Manhattan) Half, Berlin Half, any events run by runthrough, cancer research winter run, Para's 10, Sheffield Half, Ealing Half.

Races to come this year (if ankles hold up), Hyde Pk 5k, Wimbledon 5k, Hastings 5M, Rye and Richmond 10 milers, Jersey Half, Elmbridge 10k, Geneva 20k.

Edited by broadsword
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4 hours ago, davulsukur said:

So what you're saying is, if I want to be a complete write off in a few years, continue with my plan? (which is very similar to what you did)

:P

Haha, that's about it. Follow the CLB sports plan, i.e. the road to ruin.

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On 4/19/2017 at 3:02 PM, Claytons Left Boot said:

As well as playing football, my main sport years ago, was fell running. I also did some road running and ran a half marathon in around one and a half hours in addition to several 10ks. 

I then snapped my right ankle and dislocated it at the same time playing football. I was back running within five months but I rushed things and before I was 30 I had to give the running up. I bought a half decent racing bike, never joined a club, just did my own thing, cycling anything up to say 70 miles, mainly on Sunday mornings. A good ride was from Darwen to the high point of the Trough of Bowland via Longridge Fell. You can obviously taylor each ride depending on your condition or how you feel but it's fair to say that you need to be out for at least two hours to benefit fitness wise. I also had a young family at that time so, after several years of cycling, I moved on to swimming where a solid one hour of lane swimming was as good as going out for two or three hours on the bike. The downside to swimming was that I found it incredibly boring although it's a great sport if you want to bulk up a bit, mainly upper body.

I'm now a bloody wreck and with a sciatic nerve problem, limit myself to walking/dog walking as a means to keeping fit, coupled with a sensible and mainly fat free diet! For the first time in my life, I touched 14 stones on the scales at the end of last year but have now reduced that back to my 'normal' weight of bang on 13 stones.

Blimey Mark, that's an unusual and fairly elongated triathlon mate!!

For the first time in ages I recently checked myself against one of those height/weight charts, and apparently I should be 7'3".

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1 hour ago, oldjamfan1 said:

Blimey Mark, that's an unusual and fairly elongated triathlon mate!!

For the first time in ages I recently checked myself against one of those height/weight charts, and apparently I should be 7'3".

:lol::lol::lol:

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2 hours ago, oldjamfan1 said:

Blimey Mark, that's an unusual and fairly elongated triathlon mate!!

For the first time in ages I recently checked myself against one of those height/weight charts, and apparently I should be 7'3".

It's just a pity, Andy, that I couldn't manage all three at the same time!

I like the weight/height comment lol.

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I fell in love with runnimg after moving (probably) permanently to Korea. Loads of great river paths to run on, and the weather is fairly predictable.

Not as fast these days as I was a few years ago, so I've decided to just go further. I'm doing my first 50km in a few months time.

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Just got home from a landmark ride. Some may know I had a heart attack October 2015 and six months of no serious cycling took its toll on my stamina. After working hard for the last 12 months, especially through this winter, today I rode 85 miles with 6000 feet of climbing. My longest ride since the attack and my second highest ever level of climbing - summer 2015 I rode 85 miles and 8500 feet.

We also climbed Cragg Vale today which is the longest continuous gradient in England at 5.5 miles and an ascent of 970 feet.

On Thursday my training buddy and I are heading off to ride a century. It will be her first ever 100 miler, my last one was three years ago

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That's some ride Paul; congratulations.

We were talking about this the other day, sometimes, I can hit a really steep little jaunt, not long like going up gradually up a mountain but it sometimes feel like your chest is going to explode. I guess I'm talking about a really steep grade. Most mountains, hills don't post that big of an obstacle for me.

 

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Thanks Audax. It was good.

Climbing is interesting. We were a group of 12 today. Eight charged up the climbs, four of us, including me, elected for a steady ascent. There was only a one or two minutes time difference between the two choices. The right technique for the individual is the key.

I've ridden a couple of iconic climbs recently. A solo ride up Hardknott Pass, Eskdale in conditions so poor only the GPS knew I hit the top! That climb varies between 1 in 4 and 1 in 3!! 

The following weekend we went as a group to hit The Rake. This is a climb in Ramsbottom which is just under a kilometre with a gradient between 12% and 23%, 1:8 to 1:4. Even the female riders were swearing at the top of this beast!!

Hardknott is OK as it climbs like an alpine pass. The Rake simply goes straight up with no relief as there are no bends. 

Edited by Paul

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13 hours ago, Paul said:

Just got home from a landmark ride. Some may know I had a heart attack October 2015 and six months of no serious cycling took its toll on my stamina. After working hard for the last 12 months, especially through this winter, today I rode 85 miles with 6000 feet of climbing. My longest ride since the attack and my second highest ever level of climbing - summer 2015 I rode 85 miles and 8500 feet.

We also climbed Cragg Vale today which is the longest continuous gradient in England at 5.5 miles and an ascent of 970 feet.

On Thursday my training buddy and I are heading off to ride a century. It will be her first ever 100 miler, my last one was three years ago

Fleet Moss, just north of Kettlewell is a good ride. I think it's one of the highest roads in England at around 1700 ft. You drop down the other side into Hawes. We left Grassington with a few tiny snowflakes falling, by the time we got to Kettlewell it was snowing steadily and on the top of Fleet Moss it was a blizzard with thick snow on the road. We were absolutely freezing and ended up in a cafe in Hawes having hot soup. It was in April as well.

I didn't know about your heart attack Paul. Glad to see you appear to be making a nice recovery from it.

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Thanks CLB. I'm 120% recovered. Fitter today than for many years. 

Fleetmoss is on my list though not sure when I'll be heading that way. 

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