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Stuart

Owd Photos o’t’ Rovers

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13 hours ago, 47er said:

Complete lack of Rovers" scarves!

The vehicle seems pre-50's but that doesn't necessarily mean anything. Trilby hats were still common in the late 50"s going in to the 60's.

My best guess is late 50's.Haircuts look late 50's to early 60's

Guess they are travelling to Ewood (or we've won!) but in which direction? Is it Blackburn to Ewood?

Exactly where is it taken? I don't recognise any landmarks. It seems another world ago.

the infirmary is on the right as you look, so the people are walking towards Ewood

Edited by rigger

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1 hour ago, rigger said:

the infirmary is on the right as you look, so the people are walking towards Ewood

Yes they are smiling ,so obviously on the way ......

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2 hours ago, Tyrone Shoelaces said:

I used to go to Rovers in a collar tie and a suit. What else would  you wear ? Casual clothing was for working in then. I got my first pair of training shoes in 1966. We'd been playing one night and I kept them on to go to the pub for an after match drink. When I walked into the pub it was like  I was Spencer Tracy in " Bad Day At Black Rock ". A stranger in town ! It was like I had two heads ! Everybody stared at the trainers.

The past was a different place.

I've walked up that bit of road with a spring in my step on many,many occasions,.

And I've walked back down it many a time as fed up as buggery...

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11 hours ago, Tyrone Shoelaces said:

 

I've walked up that bit of road with a spring in my step on many,many occasions,.

 

8 hours ago, Elvis Biro said:

And I've walked back down it many a time as fed up as buggery...

I have to tell you this story again because every time I remember it I laugh. It is so true of football supporters in general, but especially Rovers fans.

My son who lived in Spain was coming over. He was trying to arrange to meet up with Mr Lee Grooby, formerly of this site. He asked Lee what he normally did after a game at Ewood and Grooby replied,"Walk home despondently". 🤣🤣

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21 minutes ago, bazza said:

 

I have to tell you this story again because every time I remember it I laugh. It is so true of football supporters in general, but especially Rovers fans.

My son who lived in Spain was coming over. He was trying to arrange to meet up with Mr Lee Grooby, formerly of this site. He asked Lee what he normally did after a game at Ewood and Grooby replied,"Walk home despondently". 🤣🤣

What ever happened to Lee Grooby? Doesn't work for Rovers anymore I understand. Still around?

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10 minutes ago, 47er said:

What ever happened to Lee Grooby? Doesn't work for Rovers anymore I understand. Still around?

I don't know. Last time I saw him was several years ago when he was still working for Rovers. Maybe SteB or others may know.

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Thought I recognised this picture from a book of old photos of Blackburn I have. I can't seem to upload a picture of the page it comes from but the book is 'Blackburn since 1900' and is a collection of photo's from the telegraph.

Anyway, the caption underneath the photo says: 'November 1946 and a lightening stoppage halts the buses and trams. But this group of Rovers fans used shank's pony to get to Ewood where Liverpool were the visitors'.

A quick google has the result at 0-0.

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1 hour ago, bazza said:

 

I have to tell you this story again because every time I remember it I laugh. It is so true of football supporters in general, but especially Rovers fans.

My son who lived in Spain was coming over. He was trying to arrange to meet up with Mr Lee Grooby, formerly of this site. He asked Lee what he normally did after a game at Ewood and Grooby replied,"Walk home despondently". 🤣🤣

That is brilliant!

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On 23/02/2020 at 20:18, jim mk2 said:

Lovely photo.

Boys in their school uniforms and men in smart coats and wearing ties and taking pride in their appearance.

No such thing as "casual" clothing then; those people would be aghast at the way folk dress today.

It's strange that you of all people would get misty-eyed for this era.

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7 hours ago, Ducados said:

Thought I recognised this picture from a book of old photos of Blackburn I have. I can't seem to upload a picture of the page it comes from but the book is 'Blackburn since 1900' and is a collection of photo's from the telegraph.

Anyway, the caption underneath the photo says: 'November 1946 and a lightening stoppage halts the buses and trams. But this group of Rovers fans used shank's pony to get to Ewood where Liverpool were the visitors'.

A quick google has the result at 0-0.

Good spot cheers.

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As mentioned it was indeed taken on Bolton Rd just outside of were the old Infirmary used to be,all heading towards Ewood.

These old photos always get me thinking what did these people do in their lives?,sadly most now no longer with us.The middle aged fellas would have been glad to see a game at Ewood again having just fought a World War,the older gents would have witnessed the greatest Rover of them all Bob Crompton and the glory of two top title wins.

A day at the Rovers would have been a big event for these good people and thousands alike across the country come Saturday.

Love it.

Edited by SIMON GARNERS 194

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3 hours ago, SIMON GARNERS 194 said:

As mentioned it was indeed taken on Bolton Rd just outside of were the old Infirmary used to be,all heading towards Ewood.

These old photos always get me thinking what did these people do in their lives?,sadly most now no longer with us.The middle aged fellas would have been glad to see a game at Ewood again having just fought a World War,the older gents would have witnessed the greatest Rover of them all Bob Crompton and the glory of two top title wins.

A day at the Rovers would have been a big event for these good people and thousands alike across the country come Saturday.

Love it.

Great post and a great topic by Stuart. It occurred to me that some of these supporters may have been from Liverpool. Stranded at the Boulevard by the transport crisis and making their way down on foot. All mingling nicely and no aggro....

Edited by Colt Seavers

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6 hours ago, OldEwoodBlue said:

My dad turned 18 in 1920 so it would be a bit like me watching Rovers in 1961.

Unfortunately I don't know much about which games he watched. He spoke mostly about the current times (for me) i.e. 1951 to 1965 when he died. I don't even know whether or not he went to the 1928 cup final. I doubt it. He did have a very good friend who was a professional footballer and played for the Rovers around 1929 and later Burnley. I wish I had questioned him more about players like Crompton, Latheron, Healless and Ted Harper. 

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On 23/02/2020 at 21:25, Riversider28 said:

I think the fans are on Bolton Rd with the old Infirmary frontage on the right and the wall on the left bordering the LeedsLiverppol canal. The Infirmary pub in the background on the right  

I go for this as well, also a soldier in shot with a cap badge ,possibly looking at shape Queens Lancs Regiment

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

The Photo was probably taken from the window of Ewood House Dental Surgery.That same Car Park was our makeshift Football Pitch as a child growing up in Ewood during the 80's.

Edited by SIMON GARNERS 194

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The article mentions a maker of " Healds and Reeds ". How many people on here know what they are ? 60 years ago nearly everybody would have known.

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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, SIMON GARNERS 194 said:

I think that was just the company name not the product...I may be wrong though!

Healds and Reeds are items used in the textile weaving industry. 

Edited by Riversider28

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19 hours ago, Riversider28 said:

Healds and Reeds are items used in the textile weaving industry. 

They are parts of a loom to be slightly more precise. My mum was a weaver and my extended family were mill workers back in Blackburn when it was a textile town. My uncle was a drayman at Twaites.

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41 minutes ago, SIMON GARNERS 194 said:

Always assumed it was just the name of the proprietors..you live and learn!

In the article it refers to " Harry Oates & Sons " being the makers of " Reeds & Healds ". I worked in a weaving shed during my engineering apprenticeship for about 3 months repairing looms so those are some of the terms I recall from long ago.

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3 hours ago, Tyrone Shoelaces said:

In the article it refers to " Harry Oates & Sons " being the makers of " Reeds & Healds ". I worked in a weaving shed during my engineering apprenticeship for about 3 months repairing looms so those are some of the terms I recall from long ago.

From my Dads 'Modern Textile Design and Production' 1949 Edition 42 Shillings !!....... Maybe Tyrone can explain - I haven't  a clue !

Picture1.jpg

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