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Posted (edited)
41 minutes ago, grinder said:

From my Dads 'Modern Textile Design and Production' 1949 Edition 42 Shillings !!....... Maybe Tyrone can explain - I haven't  a clue !

Picture1.jpg

Oh dear I was hoping nobody would ask me that. The last time I had to deal with these was in 1970 for three months. Most of my time then was spent removing and replacing broken loom crank shafts and not actually working on running machines. Here I go making a fool of myself. The diagrams you are looking at are an actual cross section of the weaving process.  As I remember it the " Sley ", carrying the " Reed ", rocks back and forth off a lower pivot tightening up the cloth as it goes. The Reed itself is a frame carrying lots of vertical wires, the threads ( warp ? ) goes between the wires. The " Healds" shoot up and down in conjunction with the sley allowing the shuttle carrying the weft to weave the cloth. I'll ask my mum next time we speak for the real info. She ran a dozen " Northrop " Automatic Battery looms which were actually made in Blackburn, I believe the late Fred Pickering started out as an apprentice at " Northrop's ".

I can't be the only one on here who's seen a loom working surely. Blackburn was a textile town with lots of weaving sheds back in the day.

 

Edited by Tyrone Shoelaces

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1 hour ago, Tyrone Shoelaces said:

Oh dear I was hoping nobody would ask me that. The last time I had to deal with these was in 1970 for three months. Most of my time then was spent removing and replacing broken loom crank shafts and not actually working on running machines. Here I go making a fool of myself. The diagrams you are looking at are an actual cross section of the weaving process.  As I remember it the " Sley ", carrying the " Reed ", rocks back and forth off a lower pivot tightening up the cloth as it goes. The Reed itself is a frame carrying lots of vertical wires, the threads ( warp ? ) goes between the wires. The " Healds" shoot up and down in conjunction with the sley allowing the shuttle carrying the weft to weave the cloth. I'll ask my mum next time we speak for the real info. She ran a dozen " Northrop " Automatic Battery looms which were actually made in Blackburn, I believe the late Fred Pickering started out as an apprentice at " Northrop's ".

I can't be the only one on here who's seen a loom working surely. Blackburn was a textile town with lots of weaving sheds back in the day.

 

I saw a few mills burn down in my youth 

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1 hour ago, Tyrone Shoelaces said:

Oh dear I was hoping nobody would ask me that. The last time I had to deal with these was in 1970 for three months. Most of my time then was spent removing and replacing broken loom crank shafts and not actually working on running machines. Here I go making a fool of myself. The diagrams you are looking at are an actual cross section of the weaving process.  As I remember it the " Sley ", carrying the " Reed ", rocks back and forth off a lower pivot tightening up the cloth as it goes. The Reed itself is a frame carrying lots of vertical wires, the threads ( warp ? ) goes between the wires. The " Healds" shoot up and down in conjunction with the sley allowing the shuttle carrying the weft to weave the cloth. I'll ask my mum next time we speak for the real info. She ran a dozen " Northrop " Automatic Battery looms which were actually made in Blackburn, I believe the late Fred Pickering started out as an apprentice at " Northrop's ".

I can't be the only one on here who's seen a loom working surely. Blackburn was a textile town with lots of weaving sheds back in the day.

 

I have made a few axminster looms in my time.

Did you work at Pickerings Tyrone ?

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2 hours ago, Tyrone Shoelaces said:

Oh dear I was hoping nobody would ask me that. The last time I had to deal with these was in 1970 for three months. Most of my time then was spent removing and replacing broken loom crank shafts and not actually working on running machines. Here I go making a fool of myself. The diagrams you are looking at are an actual cross section of the weaving process.  As I remember it the " Sley ", carrying the " Reed ", rocks back and forth off a lower pivot tightening up the cloth as it goes. The Reed itself is a frame carrying lots of vertical wires, the threads ( warp ? ) goes between the wires. The " Healds" shoot up and down in conjunction with the sley allowing the shuttle carrying the weft to weave the cloth. I'll ask my mum next time we speak for the real info. She ran a dozen " Northrop " Automatic Battery looms which were actually made in Blackburn, I believe the late Fred Pickering started out as an apprentice at " Northrop's ".

I can't be the only one on here who's seen a loom working surely. Blackburn was a textile town with lots of weaving sheds back in the day.

 

Very impressed Tyrone- I'll need to read my book more closely - remember Dad talking a lot about warps and wefts - sad fact of how little of this knowledge remains in what was once a textile town, still have a few of his designs though

There are some videos on British Pathe too including Dad in the design studio - albeit in Burnley........

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Posted (edited)

I served my time engineering at Stanhill Ring spinning rather than weaving but my gran and aunties ran looms at Victoria mill, good but quite austere times thinking about it but that was what we did.

#reminiscing

Edited by DeeCee

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, OldEwoodBlue said:

I have made a few axminster looms in my time.

Did you work at Pickerings Tyrone ?

No, I was in the machine tool game, building lathes, milling machines etc. I'd been loaned out for 3 months whilst the real weaving shed fitter was off sick. You should be able to give us chapter and verse on looms if you built them.

Edited by Tyrone Shoelaces

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4 hours ago, Tyrone Shoelaces said:

Oh dear I was hoping nobody would ask me that. The last time I had to deal with these was in 1970 for three months. Most of my time then was spent removing and replacing broken loom crank shafts and not actually working on running machines. Here I go making a fool of myself. The diagrams you are looking at are an actual cross section of the weaving process.  As I remember it the " Sley ", carrying the " Reed ", rocks back and forth off a lower pivot tightening up the cloth as it goes. The Reed itself is a frame carrying lots of vertical wires, the threads ( warp ? ) goes between the wires. The " Healds" shoot up and down in conjunction with the sley allowing the shuttle carrying the weft to weave the cloth. I'll ask my mum next time we speak for the real info. She ran a dozen " Northrop " Automatic Battery looms which were actually made in Blackburn, I believe the late Fred Pickering started out as an apprentice at " Northrop's ".

I can't be the only one on here who's seen a loom working surely. Blackburn was a textile town with lots of weaving sheds back in the day.

 

There were looms working in Blackburn at the turn of this century. Britannia Mill for one. I used to love the smell of a weaving shed.

Sadly we were undercut by Indians and even Egyptians and the company struggled to acclimatise as a distributor/seller from and end-to-end manufacturer.

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17 hours ago, Tyrone Shoelaces said:

 

I can't be the only one on here who's seen a loom working surely. Blackburn was a textile town with lots of weaving sheds back in the day.

 

I have worked at a couple of places with running looms.

My last place of work had them running until about 2012 before shutting the UK factory down and importing from China/India.

There is one other company in my town that still has a fully operating weaving shed still going strong today.

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Posted (edited)

That's what I think when I hear people telling me the players of today are miles better, fitter etc, than the old timers. Maybe,  but who would you rather watch ? 5 minutes of Bryan Douglas was worth a whole 90 minutes of most of what's on display today, Bradley Dack excepted. It's all about goal mouth incidents and excitement. The early sixties team I grew up on would have you dizzy with excitement. 

Edited by Tyrone Shoelaces

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Found some old newspaper clipping whilst pottering:

 

 

IMG_0080.jpg

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10 minutes ago, Gav said:

IMG_0086.jpg

Thanks Gav. I remember this lad well. He actually ran onto the pitch during the game against Coventry to get the players to sign his shaven head. I often wonder whatever became of him.

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Great photos @Gav - cheers 🍻 

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Posted (edited)

A day almost 31 years ago: How was that a penalty? How was the match not stopped or even abandoned towards the end? George Courtney, Ian Wright and Dave Clarke 5; bastards all!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yQ2bOGqh3tc

Edited by darrenrover

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5 hours ago, darrenrover said:

A day almost 31 years ago: How was that a penalty? How was the match not stopped or even abandoned towards the end? George Courtney, Ian Wright and Dave Clarke 5; bastards all!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yQ2bOGqh3tc

Without doubt the worst day of my football supporting life, it still hurts now :(

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