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Rover-the-Top

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About Rover-the-Top

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    Premier League

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  1. Rover-the-Top

    Brexit Thread

    How do you justify that it wasn't needed? Given the result, it was absolutely required, the electorate voted to change course from what would have been had there been no referendum. Even if the result had been overwhelmingly in favour of staying, I personally had been waiting a long time for the chance to vote against us becoming a member of the EU and was glad to have that chance at last. The only problem with calling the referendum was that it took so bloody long after Maastricht that opinions on it are entrenched and it's left the country divided instead of looking optimistically to our future.
  2. Rover-the-Top

    Brexit Thread

    So that's two of you who've now adopted the same point I'm making in an attempt to argue with me. It's an unusually approach, but I'm not going to even attempt to disprove myself...😂Obviously on a day-to-day basis, imports priced in dollars are affected by fluctuations in the exchange rate. But we weren't talking about if oil is more expensive for the petrol companies to buy. The question was whether the big rise in pump prices this year was down to Brexit. As you say, the effect of the exchange rate is lost in the "noise" from other factors - that was my point. And as Baz pointed out, the rise was actually to do with a more permanent oil price rise which was nothing to do with Brexit. Between the two of you, you've explained why Brexit isn't the reason why petrol prices have gone up...
  3. Rover-the-Top

    Brexit Thread

    That's true - BUT you're then making the assumption that those exchange rate fluctuations are passed onto consumers at the pumps. When you look at the data, that assumption doesn't fit.
  4. Rover-the-Top

    Brexit Thread

    I don't know it all but I do know when I'm right and when to back down... 😁What you should be thinking is why you're still trying to argue when you disproved your own argument yourself a couple of posts ago. Obviously you know you've got no comeback, that's why you're suddenly avoiding the points I've made and getting personal instead. There are and will be negative impacts in some areas because of Brexit. If and when they're raised, I won't argue because there won't be a credible argument to put forward. But when you're all taking the stance that every single thing is bad because of Brexit, it just makes it easy to pick the moments you're talking nonsense. Like with petrol prices...
  5. Rover-the-Top

    Brexit Thread

    That wasn't what I was disputing, was it? The pound has gone down, back up and then down again since the referendum. But we were talking about petrol pump prices, and how they've risen this year. And where all you remainers who think you know it all because you read an opinion piece in the Guardian fall down is, those fluctuations in exchange rates aren't necessarily passed on to the consumer. Other factors have a more significant impact, such as as you pointed out, an international row leading to the price of oil itself increasing. You're all looking to blame Brexit for everything because you want it to be true, but it's not the case.
  6. Rover-the-Top

    Brexit Thread

    So you agree then, not a result of Brexit. There, that wasn't so bad was it?
  7. Rover-the-Top

    Brexit Thread

    You can point it out as many times as you want Jim. It's a reasonable theory, Sterling goes down, oil price goes up - Sterling goes up, oil price must go down. But dig into the actual facts, and you'll find what I am saying is true, there's no correlation to back that theory up. Petrol prices rose during the first half of 2016 despite a fairly constant rate against the dollar. They stayed pretty much the same for a few months straight after the referendum and the initial big dip in the value of the pound. There was then a rise over the turn of the year and a fall as Sterling started to recover, as you might expect. But then petrol prices started to rise again despite the pound still getting stronger. And as I've said, a rapid rise during this year after Sterling reached it's strongest for two years. It might not suit what you want to believe, but these are facts. The other factors that determine petrol prices have a far greater impact than the exchange rate, and therefore any impact from voting to leave.
  8. Rover-the-Top

    Brexit Thread

    All you're doing is proving that if you want to blame Brexit, you will do even when you know the facts don't fit. Sterling is not more than 20% down against the dollar since the referendum. The rate in June 2016 was mid 1.40s, it's been around 1.28 for the past month. More to the point, it was up around 1.40, almost back at pre-referendum levels, when the big increase in petrol prices started in April. And fuel prices did not jump up by 20% in the period after the vote. So contrary to what was being claimed in this thread, Brexit has had negligble impact on petrol prices - the other factors you mention are far more significant.
  9. Rover-the-Top

    Brexit Thread

    Sounds a good argument. But one problem - the big price hike came in April and May (from £1.19 to £1.28), when the pound had been at it's strongest post referendum. Oops.
  10. Rover-the-Top

    Brexit Thread

    You can ask all you want, I'm not Dr Who and can't bring back evidence from the future. 😁 I'm not really sure what you're calling nonsense? Economic forecasts are deliberately prudent. The EU has had two recessions in the last decade. And it would be ridiculous to say it won't have another.
  11. Rover-the-Top

    Brexit Thread

    Well, I don't agree that we're being "pushed" into one, so your question doesn't really make sense to me. There's a risk of recession by leaving, but you don't need to do too much digging to realise that risk exists if we stay too. It isn't the black and white choice many make it out to be - see the Barnier quote above, he's stating if you want the good parts you have to accept the bad. If you'd rather keep things as they are, then fine, I'm not going to say anyone is wrong just because they've weighed it up differently to me. But if someone is going to talk about petrol going up as though it's a new thing since the Brexit vote, then a few facts need pointing out.
  12. Rover-the-Top

    Brexit Thread

    Based on education, experience and knowing economic factors existed prior to June 2016. Economic predictions by their nature are unlikely to come true, the fact you can foresee a potential problem presents the opportunity to avoid it. Meanwhile, the EU has fallen in to recession twice in the last 10 years. It would be folly to suggest it's a stable economy with no danger of another.
  13. Rover-the-Top

    Brexit Thread

    I know there will continue to be ups and downs as there always has been. And would be even if we remained.
  14. Rover-the-Top

    Brexit Thread

    Of course. It went up by about 9p a litre in the 6 months prior to the referendum. Then dipped back down a bit during last year. It's still not reached the levels it was at just 4-5 years ago. The bemusing thing about remainers' economic arguments is that the things they're afraid will happen have already happened whilst we've been in the EU.
  15. Rover-the-Top

    Brexit Thread

    Pearl Jam's back catalogue? Rovers' Premier League winning team? Growing up without a nanny?
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