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[Archived] Kerimoglu


elwaxo

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Or Davidson, Thomson, Philipson, Peterson, Johnson, Williamson, Jackson, Richardson....etc etc in English. :lol:

yes but theyve evolved into family names.......the practice is long dead that if david thompson had a son he would be called davidson....he would instead keep the name thompson....so its different.........i think in scandanavia they still change the name! :P

;)

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yes but theyve evolved into family names.......the practice is long dead that if david thompson had a son he would be called davidson....he would instead keep the name thompson....so its different.........i think in scandanavia they still change the name! :P

;)

hmmmm no!=) It works just like it does in the UK. I am Andersen and my dads name not anders, nor was his dads..... Actually I am not even sure how far back we have to go for its origins but its way way back....

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So if Eidur Gudjohnsen has a son it would be Eidursen as the last name?

Actually, no. I don't know all the details, but essentially that naming system is only true for most Icelandic families, but not all. Some are exempt from it, and the Gudjohnsens in question are among them. For example, Eidur's father is called Arnor Gudjohnsen (Fun trivia: Arnor was substituted in a friendly against Estonia, with the player replacing him being his son Eidur. The first, and I believe only, time that a father and son have played in the same international game).

Although if they hadn't been exempt, that's the principle they would use. However Gudjohnsen is an adopted name, or at least a more Danish/Norwegian form of the icelandic "Gudjonsson". In Denmark and Norway the "Son of..." part is "-sen", whereas in Iceland and Sweden it's "-sson". So normally someone with the first names Eiður Smári would have sons called either Eiðursson or Smárisson. In some countries, such as Russia and some other former Soviet republics, both a family name and a patronym is used.

As for MGP: Norwegian names work just like in most Europeam countries, just that Morten or his parents choose to use both their surnames.

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And in Russia, all the daughters of a man get an -a after their name. Anna Kournikova's father is called Mr. Kournikov. And Marat Safin is a brother of Alessandra (I think that's her first name, not sure) Safina.

In Holland we don't do crazy shizzle.

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In Alabama when a daughter is born they call her sister as well as daughter and son would be brother or son. Depending on the situation the offspring will refer to his mother as sis or ma and father as brother or daddy.

As I'm sure it would be the same in Dingle country too!!

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As for MGP: Norwegian names work just like in most Europeam countries, just that Morten or his parents choose to use both their surnames.

Is that the same with Tore Andre Flo? And Bjorn Tore Kvarme? Is the mothers name always first?

And in Russia, all the daughters of a man get an -a after their name. Anna Kournikova's father is called Mr. Kournikov. And Marat Safin is a brother of Alessandra (I think that's her first name, not sure) Safina.

Thats Dinara Safina, but you're right.

In Holland we don't do crazy shizzle.

4 words. Jan Vennegoor of Hesselink.

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Is that the same with Tore Andre Flo? And Bjorn Tore Kvarme? Is the mothers name always first?

Thats Dinara Safina, but you're right.

4 words. Jan Vennegoor of Hesselink.

Isn't that something to do with history? Dutch youngsters took the name of the more well-to-do when they married (not necessarily the male side). In that particular instance, the Vennegoor and the Hesslinks were of the same social standing so a double barrelled name was adopted. "of" means "or" in English iirc.

Anyhow, back to Tugay.

The interview with the midfield maestro in the matchday programme was conducted by his 12 year old son. His name - Berke Kerimoglu. So rather blows the original idea out of the water. :)

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Isn't that something to do with history? Dutch youngsters took the name of the more well-to-do when they married (not necessarily the male side). In that particular instance, the Vennegoor and the Hesslinks were of the same social standing so a double barrelled name was adopted. "of" means "or" in English iirc.

Absolutely correct. the Venegoors and the Hesselinks were two powerful Middle Ages Dutch families who married into each other, and couldn't decide what to call their offspring - so the used the double barrelled surname, and 'of' does indeed mean 'or', meaning they could use either surname or both if they wished.

Accyrover

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