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12 hours ago, den said:

The Darwen end was the home fans end when I started going renrag - around 61/62. Pretty sure about that.

That’s right. After our Saturday morning kick about by the side of the Fernhurst, one of my friends and myself would grab a quick lunch and then go to his grandma’s house on Nuttall St next to the Darwen End and collect money, 6d a time, for parking cars between the gable ends. We always said we would be there all the time, but just before kick off we would go onto the Darwen End to watch the game. With a few minutes to go we would make our way to the top of the steps and as soon as the ref blew for full time, we dashed back to continue “looking after“ the cars. Worked every time.

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1 hour ago, A Northern Horde... said:

May be wrong Gav but unfortunately I think they have the upper hand in number of Derby games won....The two hats from Pune and our recent demise aided their ascendancy of course.

?

Get the cups and medals on the table, its not even close. 

Unless as one burnley fan once tried to argue, "we've won division 4, you haven't " :lol:

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11 minutes ago, Gav said:

Get the cups and medals on the table, its not even close. 

Unless as one burnley fan once tried to argue, "we've won division 4, you haven't " :lol:

Have they terraced Pendle Hill yet?

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4 hours ago, arbitro said:

Cantello was indeed playing and an unsung player amongst the Three Degrees who attracted most of the publicity. Atkinson just let them go out and play - the game seemed much more simple then.

The plan was " make the pitch as big as you can ". Two strikers up the middle, two wingers hugging the touch line.  More room for the skilful players to make the play in midfield. A better spectacle all round.  

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3 minutes ago, Tyrone Shoelaces said:

The plan was " make the pitch as big as you can ". Two strikers up the middle, two wingers hugging the touch line.  More room for the skilful players to make the play in midfield. A better spectacle all round.  

It was much better in my book to Tyrone. I have been watching reruns of The Big Match on ITV4 over the summer and on the whole the football was far more exciting with very few defensive teams and none of this backward, sideways stuff that is far too prevalent in the modern game. Watching some of the players of that generation it was almost instinctive for their first touch to take them forward and look to attack. The bulk of teams played with natural width and simply didn't over complicate a simple game. One really interesting facet is when the camera panned to the dugout and there are invariably no more than four people in it. I'd wager that today's support staff on matchdays outnumber the vast majority of playing squads from that time.

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4 minutes ago, iacok said:

Anyone remember Halifax away? Think about 73/74. Carnage!

Remember it well. Hundreds of Rovers fans climbed over the wall where the bus depot was, slid down the shale  hill and got in free. Another time a fellow Darrener climbed over the exit gate, opened it up and we poured in. At that time both sets of fans could share the same terrace and a police cordon was the only thing keeping them apart. At that Halifax game the cordon was broken several times as the fans attacked each other. And outside after the game it was like a war zone.

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Just now, arbitro said:

Remember it well. Hundreds of Rovers fans climbed over the wall where the bus depot was, slid down the shale  hill and got in free. Another time a fellow Darrener climbed over the exit gate, opened it up and we poured in. At that time both sets of fans could share the same terrace and a police cordon was the only thing keeping them apart. At that Halifax game the cordon was broken several times as the fans attacked each other. And outside after the game it was like a war zone.

I was only a kid really then Tony and I remember being bloody scared that day!

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Just now, oldjamfan1 said:

I was only a kid really then Tony and I remember being bloody scared that day!

Yes Andy those type of days weren't for the faint hearted. We were pretty much on the fringes that day but the Rovers fans involved were certainly no shrinking violets. I knew lots of them from going round Blackburn at weekends and a lot of them used to pick their away games based on how much of a tear up there was likely to be.

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The Rovers V Burnley book I've got is called " East Lancashire Derbies " by a guy called Dean Hayes. I'm sure the author meant well but to be honest it could have been a lot better. It was published in 2001, how time flies, I'd have said just over 10 years ago !

Regarding the old Shay in Halifax - When Rochdale and Halifax were both going for promotion from the old Div 4 in the late 1960's they played each other on a Thursday night at the Shay. With one more game to play whoever won was guaranteed promotion.  There were 17,186 on that night ! It was amazing, we were packed in like sardines. Halifax won 1-0 and went up. The 'Dale won their last game the following Saturday and went up for the first time in their history. 

The thing that made me smile was the corner flag area. Because the speedway track at The Shay cut into the corners of the pitch the area near the corners were boards with turf on top with the whole lot sat on house bricks ! I know it's hard to believe but it was true. Taking a corner was an art, ideally you needed one leg shorter than the other by about 4" ! Halifax had a guy playing on the wing who was only playing because he could throw a ball from one side of the pitch to the other. ITV had a long throw contest back in the day and he won it, beating Martin Chivers in the final. As a result every throw in they got within range was like a corner. Halifax had a team full of giants, a young Chris Nicholl who later starred for Villa, was one. Most of the game was like head tennis. An awful game that was always going to be a 1-0 score line.

Edited by Tyrone Shoelaces
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21 minutes ago, arbitro said:

Yes Andy those type of days weren't for the faint hearted. We were pretty much on the fringes that day but the Rovers fans involved were certainly no shrinking violets. I knew lots of them from going round Blackburn at weekends and a lot of them used to pick their away games based on how much of a tear up there was likely to be.

I remember going to a 2-2 draw at Halifax once. I was usually on my own coming from Rochdale so I didn't get in any lumber at away games. I didn't go looking for any either.

Edited by Tyrone Shoelaces
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13 minutes ago, Tyrone Shoelaces said:

I remember going to a 2-2 draw at Halifax once. I was usually on my own coming from Rochdale so I didn't get in any lumber at away games. I didn't go looking for any either.

I went to that one .....only about 10

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1 hour ago, iacok said:

Anyone remember Halifax away? Think about 73/74. Carnage!

I was on a coach that got bricked on the way out of Halifax that night, 1973 I think, as we passed a derelict building site. A perfect ambush place with plenty of Nori’s for ammunition. The skylights on the coach went through, but fortunately non of the main windows smashed. 
Suddenly, a sports car drove onto the site and chased the yobs who had to literally run for their lives and leap over a wall to escape. The car returned to huge cheers from the watching coach passengers. It turned out the lad driving the car had just stolen it after first stealing a motor bike in Blackburn to get there. 
As we drove through Todmorden, a couple of lads threw the broken Perspex skylight pieces at a group of, probably, Dingles standing outside a pub. Crazy days. 

Edited by Riversider28
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In the interest of nostalgia.

My dads mate had been going to Ewood since the early 60's, home and away, even went to the reserve away matches for a period of time, a real dyed in the wool Rover.

I've looked up the dates and game, it was 1985, he was given a bit of a kicking on the way home from Ewood by some away fans on the Saturday, ended up in hospital, fracture to his ankle.

Rovers we due to play Crystal Palace at home on the Tuesday night, not want to miss the match he signed himself out of hospital against advice of hospital staff, and hobbled down to Ewood for the game. He endured 90 minutes of agony off the pitch, only surpassed by the agony on the pitch as Ian Miller spent 90 minutes lumping high crosses into the box for a Garner, which actually landed on the head of 6' 4" hardman Mickey Droys head, Garner never got near. 

We lost 1-0 and he never went to Ewood again after that.

He was at the Halifax game above, as was my dad and the usual rabble.

Sadly Dave is suffering from dementia after a stoke, but this story puts me in mind of him and his current struggles, I wish him all the best.

Mickey Droy

image.jpeg.dc69ccbbabcd361dd2407f139558d0ee.jpeg

Edited by Gav
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I've got another Old Trafford story.

It was a bit of a happy hunting ground for Rovers in the 1960's. I'd gone over with a City supporting mate on an Ellen Smith's coach from Rochdale for a Rovers night match and the coach parked up miles from the ground. As a consequence we were late getting into the ground. Whilst we were queuing up we heard a sort of muted roar like you get when a shot just goes wide. As I was going through the turnstile I heard a loud prolonged roar that could only mean Utd had scored. When I got to the top of the steps I asked a bloke what the score was. He said " 1-1 mate ". This could only have been in the first 5 minutes of the game.

We didn't play particular well that night and we were under the cosh for lots of the game. Half way through the second half we were under prolonged pressure and ultimately Utd scored at the far end from us.

After that the game was petering out without Rovers looking much like scoring.

Knowing it was a long way back to the coach about 5 minutes from the end my pal said to me " Come on lets go and find the coach ". So we left and made our way back to an empty coach. We'd been sat there about 5 or so minutes when a group of Utd fans got onto the coach. One said to the other " Bloody Rovers are a jinx, the jammy bastards were never in that game ! "

My ears picked up at that and I said " What was the final score ? " The bloke said " It finished 2 apiece ".

So of the four goals I saw one, and that was over a hundred yards away. According to the record books the two Rovers scorers I missed were Mike Harrison and Andy McEvoy. 

Edited by Tyrone Shoelaces
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This thread has developed into an absolutely brilliant read. Some of these stories are priceless.Keep them coming please.

Reading earlier in this thread about the Kenny Samson Derek Statham comparison reminded me of a documentary about Bobby Robson. Apparently he couldn't remember his players names and always called Samson  Derek Statham. He called Shay Given Shay Brennan, and best of all, called Bryan Robson Bobby.

 

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I’m also loving these personal memories from everyone, especially Tyrone. Whilst I have chipped in with a couple of tales, they only relate to what happened outside of the ground. I really wish I could remember more about what actually happened on the pitch, particularly the 60’s. Reading some of the details from you all makes me wonder what I was actually looking at during the games. I have a vivid memory of what the players looked like, but very little about individual players or games. I can remember going from one end of the ground to the other, even things like the “Beware Of Pickpockets “ posters pasted outside the ground when the Scousers were in town. 

I never went to watch any of the other local teams play when we were playing away, like Tyrone did. I was well into fishing so I would get on the Ribble bus down to the De Tabley and my friend and I would fish on a stretch a little upstream from there. As it got to the late 60’s work commitments meant I was only able to go to midweek games and then for most of the 70’s I worked around the country so I saw even less matches unless we happened to be playing somewhere near and could swap shifts with someone.

Keep the memories flooding in guys, absolutely brilliant.

 

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@USABlue  

@Parsonblue

Both have some great stories.

But I agree, I'd much rather hear 47er, Jim, Parson, Den and TS talk about the matches, seeing some of the greats.

Did you nip to the pub before games? what was Ewood like back then, Albion pub, Aqueduct, Fernhurst, the big gates.

Was it true Stanley Matthews Hardly ever played at Ewood because Dougie was better? 

Edited by Gav
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2 hours ago, Gav said:

In the interest of nostalgia.

My dads mate had been going to Ewood since the early 60's, home and away, even went to the reserve away matches for a period of time, a real dyed in the wool Rover.

I've looked up the dates and game, it was 1985, he was given a bit of a kicking on the way home from Ewood by some away fans on the Saturday, ended up in hospital, fracture to his ankle.

Rovers we due to play Crystal Palace at home on the Tuesday night, not want to miss the match he signed himself out of hospital against advice of hospital staff, and hobbled down to Ewood for the game. He endured 90 minutes of agony off the pitch, only surpassed by the agony on the pitch as Ian Miller spent 90 minutes lumping high crosses into the box for a Garner, which actually landed on the head of 6' 4" hardman Mickey Droys head, Garner never got near. 

We lost 1-0 and he never went to Ewood again after that.

He was at the Halifax game above, as was my dad and the usual rabble.

Sadly Dave is suffering from dementia after a stoke, but this story puts me in mind of him and his current struggles, I wish him all the best.

Mickey Droy

image.jpeg.dc69ccbbabcd361dd2407f139558d0ee.jpeg

Ha, I remember the Palace game.  It was Droy that got the winner and when he scored he stood and roared.  It was another petering out promotion challenge.

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3 minutes ago, Tyrone Shoelaces said:

Great cross there from Windy followed by an even better header from Speedie. They should show this clip to Brererton and Gallagher - that's how you jump for a ball.  Rovers undone by an alehouse ball for the equaliser.

i was at this one,wonderful old ground,had kick about on the beach before the game? great header from speedie,for someone who short he was a fantastic header of  a ball,he used to hang in the air for ages,the sunderland fans absolutely hated him,apparently due to some brawl in his coventry days?

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